rivalship


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a Work, which has almost monopolized the talents of the Country, and with which I should have continued a course of literary rivalship with as much success, as might be supposed to attend a young Recruit who should oppose himself to a Phalanx of disciplined Warriors.
Those on the other hand, who expected from it much and varied original composition, have naturally relinquished it in favour of the New MONTHLY MAGAZINE; a Work, which has almost monopolized the talents of the Country, and with which I should have continued a course of literary rivalship with as much success, as might be supposed to attend a young Recruit who should oppose himself to a Phalanx of disciplined Warriors.
For two years the battalions have fought side by side, and have striven in friendly rivalship [sic] in the cricket and football fields.
Washington recommended as the great rule of conduct that the United States primarily pursue commercial relations with other nations and have with them "as little political connection as possible." Binding the destiny of America to Europe would only serve unnecessarily to "entangle" the new nation's peace and prosperity with "the toils of European Ambition, Rivalship, Interest, Humour [and] Caprice."
considerable as to forbid a successful rivalship, without the extraordinary
Why, by intervening our destiny with that of any part of Europe, entangle our peace and prosperity in the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humor, or caprice?" Why indeed?
(150) Already, Jefferson noted, Pennsylvania was investing in public works to connect it with the West, (151) and New York was soon to follow, producing "a rivalship between the Hudson and Patowmac for the residue of the commerce of all the country Westward of L[ake] Erie, on the waters of the lakes, of the Ohio and upper parts of the Missisipi." (152) Although Virginia had great natural advantages over its potential rivals, entering such a contest by constructing its own system of public works would involve "immense expence." (153) Commercial rivalry over the West threatened to worsen an already harmful situation, and Jefferson saw federal control as necessary to prevent it.
(63) Indeed, said Hamilton, "between agriculture and commerce," there existed a "rivalship." (64) Hamilton conceived of the power to regulate commerce as "national," whereas "the supervision of agriculture and of other concerns of a similar nature ...
Warning his fellow citizens against permanent alliances in the conduct of foreign policy, Washington declared: "Why, by interweaving our destiny with any part of Europe, entangle our peace and prosperity in the toils of European ambition, Rivalship, Interest, Humour, or Caprice?" That question, Lake shows in this valuable book, has remained at the forefront of American thinking about foreign affairs ever since.
Below, the open space, through every nook Of the wide area, twinkles, is alive With heads; the midway region, and above, Is thronged with staring pictures and huge scrolls, Dumb proclamations of the Prodigies; With chattering monkeys dangling from their poles, And children whirling in their roundabouts, With those that stretch the neck and strain the eyes, And crack the voice in rivalship, the crowd Inviting; with buffoons against buffoons Grimacing, writhing, screaming,--him who grinds The hurdy-gurdy, at the fiddle weaves, Rattles the salt-box, thumps the kettle-drum, And him who at the trumpet puffs his cheeks, The silver-collared Negro with his timbrel, Equestrians, tumblers, women, girls, and boys, Blue-breeched, pink-vested, with high-towering plumes.
"Why, by interweaving our destiny with that of any part of Europe, entangle our peace and prosperity in the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humor or caprice?" If that concern were justified in Washington's day (as it certainly was!), how much more so does it apply now, concerning not only Europe but the rest of the world, and, most especially, the very hostile and anti-American UN.
Even as Madison defended the federated nature of the Constitution, he believed that "the more readily" the people "sympathize with each other, the more seasonably can they interpose a common manifestation of their sentiments, the more certainty will they take the alarm at usurpation or oppression, and the more effectually will they consolidate their defence of the public liberty." (36) (Emphasis in original.) This required them to eradicate the kinds of "local prejudices and mistaken rivalships" that he believed the Hamiltonians were looking to exploit and instead "erect over the whole" nation "one paramount Empire of reason, benevolence and brotherly affection." (37)