Roaring

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ROARING. A disease among horses occasioned by the circumstance of the neck of the windpipe being too narrow for accelerated respiration; the disorder is frequently produced by sore throat or other topical inflammation.
     2. A horse affected with this malady is rendered less serviceable, and he is therefore unsound. 2 Stark. R. 81; S. C. 3 Eng. Com. Law Rep. 255; 2 Camp. R. 523.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in classic literature ?
He saw a buck pass--an old buck--and then a young and plump one came opposite the giant in ambush, and Schneider's eyes went wide and a scream of terror almost broke from his lips as he saw the agile beast at his side spring straight for the throat of the young buck and heard from those human lips the hunting roar of a wild beast.
He had almost reached it when a horrid roar broke from the mouth of the cave and almost simultaneously a gaunt, hunger mad lion leaped into the daylight of the gulch.
He roared and roared again; toasted Mr Tappertit a hundred times; declared himself a Bulldog to the core; and vowed to be faithful to him to the last drop of blood in his veins.
It was neither snarl, nor growl, nor roar, that cry, but a sheer scream, as if something had broken inside of him.
There was a flash of flame, the roar of the discharge, and an answering roar of pain and anger from the beast.
The lion was quite close to him now--but a few paces intervened--he crouched, and then, with a deafening roar, he sprang.
Of a sudden the guns on the slope roared out a message of warning.
He gave the words of greeting, and the first regiment roared "Hurrah!" so deafeningly, continuously, and joyfully that the men themselves were awed by their multitude and the immensity of the power they constituted.
But suddenly he roared an oath and advanced upon the rolling fighters.
"Mint-julep" roars one of the barmen; "Claret sangaree!" shouts another; "Cocktail!" "Brandy-smash!" "Real mint-julep in the new style!" All these cries intermingled produced a bewildering and deafening hubbub.
Half my power is gone with that Belt!" roared the King.
With sloping masts and dipping prow, As who pursued with yell and blow Still treads the shadow of his foe And forward bends his head, The ship drove fast, loud roared the blast, And southward aye we fled.