roll

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Roll

To commit a Robbery by force. A record of the proceedings of a court or public office.

In some states, a judgment roll is required to be filed by the clerk of the court when he or she enters judgment. It normally contains the summons, pleadings, admissions, and each judgment and order involving the merits of the case or affecting the final judgment. In the federal courts and most state courts, judgments are recorded in the civil docket or criminal docket.

In old English practice, a judgment roll was a roll of parchment containing the entries of the proceedings in an action at law including the entry of judgment. It was filed in the treasury of the court.

A tax roll is a list of the persons and property subject to the payment of a particular tax, with the amounts due; it is compiled and verified in proper form to enable the collecting officers to enforce the tax.

roll

noun account, album, catalogue, census, directory, docket, document, enumeration, index, ledger, list, membership, muster, record, register, registry, roster, schedule, tabula
See also: docket, file, record, register, schedule

ROLL. A schedule of parchment which may be turned up with the hand in the form of a pipe or tube. Jacob, L. D. h.t.
     2. In early times, before paper came in common use, parchment was the substance employed for making records, and, as the art of bookbinding was but little used, economy suggested as the most convenient mode of adding sheet to sheet, as were found requisite, and they were tacked together in such manner that the whole length might be wound up together in the form of spiral rolls.
     3. Figuratively it signifies the records of a court or office. In Pennsylvania the master of the rolls was an officer in whose office were recorded the acts of the legislature. 1 Smith's Laws, 46.

References in classic literature ?
You must be careful that the rolls last till our return.
You must not hurry, you must not look nervous, though you know that you are a mark for every rifle within extreme range, and above all if you are smitten you must make as little noise as possible and roll inwards through the files.
Without involving myself in a dispute I shall merely observe that, so far as my experience goes, the square pieces of pasteboard now delivered to passengers are much more convenient and useful along the road than the antique roll of parchment.
Excepting one or two men who, each with a long roll of half-crowns, chequered with a few stray sovereigns, in his left hand, staked their money at every roll of the ball with a business-like sedateness which showed that they were used to it, and had been playing all day, and most probably all the day before, there was no very distinctive character about the players, who were chiefly young men, apparently attracted by curiosity, or staking small sums as part of the amusement of the day, with no very great interest in winning or losing.
At such moments, starting from a windward roll, I would go flying through the air with dizzying swiftness, as though I clung to the end of a huge, inverted pendulum, the arc of which, between the greater rolls, must have been seventy feet or more.
The ship, after a pause of comparative steadiness, started upon a series of rolls, one worse than the other, and for a time Jukes, preserving his equilibrium, was too busy to open his mouth.
A tremendous place is close before us, the black driver rolls his eyes, screws his mouth up very round, and looks straight between the two leaders, as if he were saying to himself, 'We have done this often before, but NOW I think we shall have a crash.
He had paid little attention to the boy until on one occasion he had seen him accidentally display a roll of bank notes.
The onset of troops is like the rush of a torrent which will even roll stones along in its course.
The roll of the drum at that unquiet crisis seemed to go through the streets, less as the martial music of the soldiers, than as a muster-call to the inhabitants themselves.
And presently I descried his luggage coming along - a real sailor's chest, carried by means of rope-beckets between two men, with a couple of leather portmanteaus and a roll of charts sheeted in canvas piled upon the lid.
Madam," he began, wonderfully preserving the roll in his voice, "it was a monkey.