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Under NASDAQ Listing Rule 5635(c)(4), the company's compensation committee granted Dr Rote with a stock option to purchase 60,000 shares of its common stock, a performance-based restricted stock unit award covering 15,000 common stock as well as a time-based restricted stock unit award covering 10,000 common stock.
The process of rote learning fixes the information in the memory through sheer repetition.
Tunnicliff will continue nursing in a casual rote and is pursuing a business idea.
Nevertheless, experiences in learning musical passages by rote, with an emphasis on listening, are beneficial.
Rote carefully examined several alternative CRM solutions before discovering Assistly.
Rahat Khan, a student of local university said that from the primary to BSC level he never try to understand the topic but always busy in rote that's he never achieved good marks in any examination.
The discount rote used, generally the appropriate cost of capital, incorporates the risk level of future cash flows.
Lanza rote at three-star apartments in Costa Teguise, pounds 209 per person.
The modeling I have provided in the past is not now as consistently present, I don't know my students as well or in the same ways, timing and momentum are compromised, more complex and valuable tasks give way to the rote and in-class interaction is replaced by online activities that are nowhere near as satisfying or edifying to me or my students.
A page of true facts about squid offers a fascinating wrap-up to this uplifting tale with a message about hidden qualities inside oneself and beyond rote passivity.
Both male drivers--living in the same ZIP code area, approximately the same age, and driving similar make and model sedans--might represent the same exposure to Company A and, accordingly, would be charged premiums based on the same rote.
But in some ways, such challenges chime with the Montessori educational ethos, which professes to focus on the 'whole child', rather than just seeing pupils as the object of rote learning.