rout

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rout

a group of three or more people proceeding to commit an illegal act.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

ROUT, crim. law. A disturbance of the peace by persons assembled together with an intention to do a thing, which, if executed, would have made them rioters, and actually making a motion towards the execution of their purpose.
     2. It generally agrees in all particulars with a riot, except only in this, that it may be a complete offence without the execution of the intended enterprise. Hawk. c. 65, s. 14; 1 Russ. on Cr. 253; 4 Bl. Com. 140; Vin. Abr. Riots, &c., A 2 Com. Dig. Forcible Entry, D 9.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in classic literature ?
All the best of them were being worn out by the great weight of their armour, but the two valiant heroes, Thrasymedes and Antilochus, had not yet heard of the death of Patroclus, and believed him to be still alive and leading the van against the Trojans; they were keeping themselves in reserve against the death or rout of their own comrades, for so Nestor had ordered when he sent them from the ships into battle.
Rout?" The chief engineer only cleared his throat with the air of a man who knows the value of a good billet.
The wanton airs, from the tree-top, Laughingly through the lattice drop -- The bodiless airs, a wizard rout, Flit through thy chamber in and out, And wave the curtain canopy So fitfully -- so fearfully -- Above the closed and fringed lid
About, about, in reel and rout The death-fires danced at night; The water, like a witch's oils, Burnt green, and blue and white.
The long lances, the heavy maces, the sixbladed battle axes, and the well tempered swords of the knights played havoc among them, so that the rout was complete; but, not content with victory, Prince Edward must glut his vengeance, and so he pursued the citizens for miles, butchering great numbers of them, while many more were drowned in attempting to escape across the Ouse.