sadness


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References in classic literature ?
More especially is this the case with those whose lines breathe sadness, where the refrain comes like a sigh at the end of a regret:
She speaks somewhere of the "sadness of a summer's evening." How wonderfully true--like everything that came from that wonderful pen--the observation is!
In the half darkness the man talked and the boy listened, filled with sadness.
"My sadness? You are mistaken, mademoiselle; no, it is not sadness I experience."
At other times, incited by such sadness, images of Skipper and Mister Haggin would throng his mind; images, too, of Terrence, and Biddy, and Michael, and the rest of the long-vanished life at Meringe Plantation.
But instead of that, Hetty, in spite of herself, began to cry, half out of ill temper at the denial, half out of the day's repressed sadness.
"Strange!" perhaps you will say, "this rush of impulse to-wards a course that might have seemed the most repugnant to her present state of mind, and in only the second night of her sadness!"
I see the lights of the village Gleam through the rain and the mist, And a feeling of sadness comes o'er me, That my soul cannot resist;
A feeling of sadness and longing, That is not akin to pain, And resembles sorrow only As the mist resembles the rain.
The impression left is one of a pleasurable sadness. And if, in the remaining compositions which I shall introduce to you, there be more or less of a similar tone always apparent, let me remind you that (how or why we know not) this certain taint of sadness is inseparably connected with all the higher manifestations of true Beauty.
A feeling of sadness and longing That is not akin to pain, And resembles sorrow only As the mist resembles the rain.
As she named the Empress, Anna Pavlovna's face suddenly assumed an expression of profound and sincere devotion and respect mingled with sadness, and this occurred every time she mentioned her illustrious patroness.