scapegrace


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Related to scapegrace: unabashedly, unobtrusively
See: degenerate
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He admires Verlaine the poet, but having grown up constantly abandoned by his scapegrace father, Rimbaud must have subconsciously resented Verlaine for abandoning his infant son Georges.
In response to her own legal secretary who views the scapegoating of adulterous women in modern society in contrast to their scapegrace male counterparts as a fatalistic fact of life--"I don't make the rules," the worker observes--Amanda cannot be quite so cynical: "Sure you [make the rules], we all do.
124) He was a top craftsman and an inveterate scapegrace.
7) The Generalissimo offers the Judas figure of Polchek as a scapegrace.
His mother, Felecita Rachele Coen, was Jewish; his father, Ugo Edoardo Poll, something of a scapegrace, was induced to undertake the experiments of marriage and religious conversion for the sum of 4000 florins.
Though his family included one scapegrace of note, namely Thesiger's first cousin Stephen Ward, unfortunate ponce to Profumo, it also produced, in Thesiger's uncle Frederic Chelmsford, a Viceroy of India.
Dryden's poem, though an affirmation of Anglicanism, is an exemplar of objectivity by contemporary standards; its moderation, however, is managed with fond tututs to botched Infallibility and felicitous squibs on scapegrace evangelicals.
His is a story of continuous effort, failures, and a slow making of his way through the world of shabby private theatres, those scapegrace, rough-and-ready venues for stage-struck apprentices and amateur writers.
A series of ill-advised romantic adventures and other colorful indiscretions eventually brought the scapegrace to a church trial and his solemn ejection from the congregation.
Elder brother Paul (played by Rami Malek) is a decent-hearted 16-year- old scapegrace.
On the other hand, by 1620-25 the journal represented a scapegrace past he perhaps preferred to forget.
Even Austen's naming of her characters refers to, while inverting, Shakespeare's: Sir Thomas's pious younger son inherits the name of the Bastard Edmund, while his scapegrace brother assumes the name of Edgar's mad alter ego, Poor Tom.