skeptic

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So, they cannot be called sceptics because scepticism is a healthy, questioning attitude to all and sundry, yet these individuals grasp at any weather phenomenon that appears to contradict the theories of global warming.
Unlike previous efforts, the temperature data from various sources was not homogenised by hand - a key criticism by climate sceptics.
Science writer Simon Singh, heading up the challenge alongside the Merseyside Sceptics Society, said: "This is not a trivial issue because many vulnerable, grieving and desperate people turn to Sally for support and advice.
We therefore have many sceptics in the modern world - people who simply refuse to believe anything.
Just as Russell is not an Academic Sceptic so Wittgenstein is not at all like the Pyrrhonist.
5 degrees over the past 250 years has made a leading climate change sceptic change his mind.
Svavarsson pays a special attention to the central piece of evidence for Pyrrho's views, a passage from the Peripatetic philosopher Aristocles of Messene, which is usually read in two opposing ways, presenting Pyrrho either as an advocate of the metaphysical thesis of the indeterminacy of things, or as a sceptic who insists that we cannot decide how things really are.
I mean, sceptic is one of the politer terms being used to describe those who do not embrace calamity.
My suggestion is also reinforced by Descartes's claim that "[n]o sceptic nowadays (hodierni) has any doubt in practice about whether he has a head, or whether two and three make five, and so on" (AT 7:547/CSM 2:375; emphasis added).
He believes he can give the sceptic a definitive answer.
Euro sceptic Nick Budgen raged: "We've got to offer a choice and show we're different from Labour.
Wright's strategy is to "give" the sceptic almost everything he or she wants, and then show that, even in circumstances maximally congenial to the sceptic, there will be a large number of beliefs the holding of which is warranted.