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Daniel Boyarin, "Judaism as a Free Church: Footnotes to John Howard Yoder's The Jewish-Christian Schism Revisited," 19.
Meanwhile Christians of the 15th century had become angry and were determined that the schism be healed there and then in humble Constance.
9) In the North, the battle over inerrancy manifested itself in the bitter attacks on Fuller Theological Seminary and infighting within the Evangelical Theological Society, while in the South the fundamentalists gained control of the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) leadership, which resulted in schism and the denomination's increasing withdrawal from the larger realm of Baptist life.
For decades significant numbers of people have been celebrating weekly Masses and otherwise functioning as eucharistic communities fully in communion with Rome while at the same time clearly stating that they are in principled and prayerful disagreement with specific teachings and policies rather than in schism.
Jean Gerson and his fellow professors at Paris had a major role and prominent voice in developments associated with the Schism that tarnished the papacy and splintered Christian allegiances from 1378 to 1415.
According to Bob Larkin, a longtime member of the Central Committee, there are lingering problems associated with the schism.
In his attempt to end the Palestinian schism, President Mahmoud Abbas reviewed the means to push forward his initiative to visit the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip with a delegation from the Islamist Hamas organization, the Beirut daily AN NAHAR reported on Sunday.
The onus for this schism, the statement suggests, lies squarely on the shoulders of the conservatives.
The "ethics of preservation" that Boyarin invokes is familiar to Mennonites, who in recent years have reconsidered the Anabaptist/Christendom schism.
Recent events crystallized the process of disintegration which has been under way for years (see "Anglican Community: The final schisms," C.
This dialectic manifests itself most painfully, it has to be said, in the German pavilion's exhibition of Thomas Scheibitz and Tino Sehgal, where desperate conventionalization, on the one hand, and an almost frenetic anti-aesthetic on the other, embody this schism as though it were a program.
Several breaks over the first millennium of Christianity--culminating in the great schism of 1054--split the church into East and West, Orthodox and Catholic.