schoolmaster

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See: pedagogue

SCHOOLMASTER. One employed in teaching a school.
     2. A schoolmaster stands in loco parentis in relation to the pupils committed to his charge, while they are under his care, so far as to enforce obedience to his, commands, lawfully given in his capacity of school-master, and he may therefore enforce them by moderate correction. Com. Dig. Pleader, 3 M 19; Hawk. c. 60, sect. 23. Vide Correction.
     3. The schoolmaster is justly entitled to be paid for his important and arduous services by those who employ him. See 1 Bing. R. 357 8 Moore's Rep. 368. His duties are to teach his pupils what he has undertaken, and to have a special care over their morals. See 1 Stark. R. 421.

References in classic literature ?
I found the schoolmaster there, leaning with his arms folded against a big rock, gazing out to sea.
The schoolmaster had been watching there all night.
Flowers that had been planted by the hands of the schoolmaster's bride flung their sweetness on the shadowy air, like the beauty and blessing of sacred yesterdays.
'You have been walking a long way,' said the schoolmaster.
'Yes,' said the old schoolmaster, observing that her attention was caught by these latter specimens.
As the schoolmaster said this, he saw that a small blot of ink had been thrown on one of the copies, so he took a penknife from his pocket, and going up to the wall, carefully scraped it out.
"Go home all of you to dinner," said the schoolmaster, "except Jacob.
Dempster." said Miss Halcombe, addressing the schoolmaster; "and we little expected to find you occupied in exorcising a ghost.
On that point Bartle was mute, and it was even a secret where he had lived previous to the twenty years in which happily for the peasants and artisans of this neighbourhood he had been settled among them as their only schoolmaster. If anything like a question was ventured on this subject, Bartle always replied, "Oh, I've seen many places--I've been a deal in the south," and the Loamshire men would as soon have thought of asking for a particular town or village in Africa as in "the south."
It's no harm for me to be a bit fiery and stiff-backed--I'm an old schoolmaster, and shall never want to get on to a higher perch.
'Well, I can spare the evening,' said the schoolmaster. 'I am ready to walk with you.'
They looked at the little creature with a wonder that did not diminish, and the schoolmaster said: 'I am sorry your fine ladies are so inconsiderate.'