SEA

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SEA

abbreviation for SINGLE EUROPEAN ACT.

SEA. The ocean; the great mass of waters which surrounds the land, and which probably extends from pole to pole, covering nearly three quarters of the globe. Waters within the ebb and flow of the tide, are to be considered the sea. Gilp. R. 526.
     2. The sea is public and common to all people, and every person has an equal right to navigate it, or to fish there; Ang. on Tide Wat. 44 to 49; Dane's Abr. c. 68, a. 3, 4; Inst. 2, 1, 1; and to land upon the sea, shore. (q.v.)
     3. Every nation has jurisdiction to the distance of a cannon shot, (q, v.) or marine league, over the water adjacent to its shore. 2 Cranch, 187, 234; 1 Circuit Rep. 62; Bynk. Qu. Pub. Juris. 61; 1 Azuni Mar. Law, 204; Id. 185; Vattel, 207:

References in periodicals archive ?
167) illustrate that the warranty of seaworthiness was an implied term
His designs are based on ancient Inuit models, but with watertight compartments for greater seaworthiness.
We became quite good at crewing our boat, and worked towards, and gained, our Competent Crew status, which is the benchmark of a crew's seaworthiness.
The design was driven to optimize speed and seaworthiness in order to ensure swift transfer of personnel while maximizing crew comfort," the statement continued.
First, it will undergoing full checks for seaworthiness in Dubai that could take up to three months, said Khamis Juma Buamin, chairman of shipyard operator Drydocks World.
A mandatory oil-containment barge, the Arctic Challenger, failed for months to meet Coast Guard requirements for seaworthiness and a ship mishap resulted in damage to a critical piece of equipment intended to cap a blown well.
Heydarkhani recruited passengers, lied to them about the seaworthiness of the boats, took their passports and mobile phones and an estimated $1.
The amazing seaworthiness of Viking vessels owes much to flexibility in the construction but add a fictional iron cladding and the solidity combined with the shallow midships draught would be fatal.
All was well until late June we heard that the US boat (Audacity of Hope) had private complaint about its seaworthiness," lamented Heap.
The only sensible word I've heard regarding Greece's stupid move to block the flotilla comes from Professor Richard Falk: "Greece has no right to detain foreign-flagged ships in its ports other than for purposes of assuring seaworthiness via timely inspection.
As part of its mandate, the directorate of marine affairs, among others, conduct annual and intermediate safety ship surveys/inspections to ensure the seaworthiness of the Namibian ships.