Concussion

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CONCUSSION, civ. law. The unlawful forcing of another by threats of violence to give something of value. It differs from robbery in this, that in robbery the thing is taken by force, while in concussion it is obtained by threatened violence. Hein. Lec. El, Sec. 1071

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cause of death was a traumatic brain injury resulting from second impact syndrome. 2010 Tackling Defensive Spring A college player aged 21 back football years was injured during a spring season game.
Second impact syndrome or cerebral swelling after sporting head injury.
The most serious complication is second impact syndrome, which usually occurs when concussion is unrecognized or not well managed.
In fact, there have been no clearly defined cases of "second impact syndrome" in the adult athlete in sports other than boxing (8).
By playing on while concussed, Keegan was exposed to the risk of the potentially fatal 'second impact syndrome' from another head injury.
The coroner ruled that Ben's death was second impact syndrome following concussion, and could have been avoided had someone been able to recognise the signs of concussion and remove him from the game.
Benjamin Robinson, 14, died from a rare version of traumatic brain injury called second impact syndrome after a school rugby match in Co Antrim in 2011.
He was a coach and a parent who had listened attentively to my warnings about second impact syndrome and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.
'He risks what is known as 'second impact syndrome'.
A second concussion too soon after the first can result in second impact syndrome, which is often fatal and is believed to have caused the death of an Idaho State University rugby player who suffered two head injuries during a pair of games at the UO in February.
The latter phenomenon, termed "second impact syndrome," has been reported more frequently since it was first characterized in 1984 (6-8).