person

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Person

In general usage, a human being; by statute, however, the term can include firms, labor organizations, partnerships, associations, corporations, legal representatives, trustees, trustees in Bankruptcy, or receivers.

A corporation is a "person" for purposes of the constitutional guarantees of equal protection of laws and Due Process of Law.

Foreign governments otherwise eligible to sue in United States courts are "persons" entitled to institute a suit for treble damages for alleged antitrust violations under the Clayton Act (15 U.S.C.A. § 12 et seq.).

Illegitimate children are "persons" within the meaning of the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

The phrase interested person refers to heirs, devisees, children, spouses, creditors, beneficiaries, and any others having a property right in, or a claim against, a trust estate or the estate of a decedent, ward, or protected person. It also refers to personal representatives and to fiduciaries.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

person

n. 1) a human being. 2) a corporation treated as having the rights and obligations of a person. Counties and cities can be treated as a person in the same manner as a corporation. However, corporations, counties and cities cannot have the emotions of humans such as malice, and therefore are not liable for punitive damages. (See: party, corporation)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

person

the object of legal rights. There are two kinds of legal person: human beings and artificial persons such as corporations. A PARTNERSHIP in England is not a separate legal person but in Scotland it is said to have quasi-personality.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

PERSON. This word is applied to men, women and children, who are called natural persons. In law, man and person are not exactly synonymous terms. Any human being is a man, whether he be a member of society or not, whatever may be the rank he holds, or whatever may be his age, sex, &c. A person is a man considered according to the rank he holds in society, with all the rights to which the place he holds entitles him, and the duties which it imposes. 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 137.
     2. It is also used to denote a corporation which is an artificial person. 1 Bl. Com. 123; 4 Bing. 669; C. 33 Eng. C. L R. 488; Woodes. Lect. 116; Bac. Us. 57; 1 Mod. 164.
     3. But when the word "Persons" is spoken of in legislative acts, natural persons will be intended, unless something appear in the context to show that it applies to artificial persons. 1 Scam. R. 178.
     4. Natural persons are divided into males, or men; and females or women. Men are capable of all kinds of engagements and functions, unless by reasons applying to particular individuals. Women cannot be appointed to any public office, nor perform any civil functions, except those which the law specially declares them capable of exercising. Civ. Code of Louis. art. 25.
     5. They are also sometimes divided into free persons and slaves. Freemen are those who have preserved their natural liberty, that is to say, who have the right of doing what is not forbidden by the law. A slave is one who is in the power of a master to whom he belongs. Slaves are sometimes ranked not with persons but things. But sometimes they are considered as persons for example, a negro is in contemplation of law a person, so as to be capable of committing a riot in conjunction with white men. 1 Bay, 358. Vide Man.
     6. Persons are also divided into citizens, (q.v.) and aliens, (q.v.) when viewed with regard to their political rights. When they are considered in relation to their civil rights, they are living or civilly dead; vide Civil Death; outlaws; and infamous persons.
     7. Persons are divided into legitimates and bastards, when examined as to their rights by birth.
     8. When viewed in their domestic relations, they are divided into parents and children; husbands and wives; guardians and wards; and masters and servants son, as it is understood in law, see 1 Toull. n. 168; 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 1890, note.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
. "Second Person Fiction: Narrative You as Addressee and/or Protagonist." AAA - Arbeiten aus Anglistik und Amerikanistik 18 (1993): 217-47.
"'You are about to begin reading': The nature and function of second person point of view." Diss.
"Second Person Point of View in Narrative." Critical Survey of Short Fiction.
. "Narrative Apostrophe: Case Studies in Second Person Fiction." Diss.
. "Orality, Reader Address and the 'Anonymous You': On Translating Second Person References from Modern Greek Prose." Journal of Modern Greek Studies 8 (1990): 223-43.
"The Poetics and Politics of Second Person Narrative." Genre 24 (1991): 309-30.
"La segunda persona y el narratario en los cuentos de Cortazar" ["The Second Person and the Narratee in the Stories of Cortazar"].
Second-person fiction is, however, least affected by this neutralization because the second-person pronoun in its generic or generalized usage - which constitutes its major opening gambit, successfully steering the reader into the fictional world so oddly represented by the second person - always relies on the submerged deictic significance of the original address function of this pronoun, even where that deictic significance is then channeled into an enhancement of the reflectoral quality of the text.(39)
On the basis of these deictic givens one can, I hope, demonstrate a number of potential exploitations of the second person although these potential tendencies of use can be combined and need not result in any one specific thematic transformation.
Such applications of the apostrophic and dialogic connotations of the second person are usually set in a dynamic "I" versus "you" structure and sometimes involve tensions on the level of address as well as merely on the level of past experience.

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