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second

(Backer), noun advocate, aide, angel, backer, champion, endorser, patron, promoter, supporter

second

(Moment), noun before you know it, brief peeiod of time, flash, flash of an eyelid, instant

second

verb approve, assist, authorize, back, back up, confirm, endorse, favor, pass, ratify, receipt, recommend, sanction, stand behind, subscribe, support, validate, vote for, warrant
Associated concepts: second lien
See also: abet, abettor, advocate, agree, aid, approve, assist, assistant, backer, bear, concur, confirm, countersign, deputy, endorse, help, indorse, justify, organize, point, proctor, promote, recommend, replacement, side, support, uphold

SECOND. A measure equal to one sixtieth part of a minute. Vide Measure.

References in periodicals archive ?
Firstly God gives existence, and secondly being Himself Life, al-Hayy, and the Giver of life, al-Hayyat, He is the source and bestower of all life.
Secondly, some students would like to have more time for this project.
Secondly, which famous film star was nicknamed Bryce?
Secondly, 404 requires that the auditors conduct a separate investigation into your internal controls.
Secondly, the recycling rate for plastic beverage containers that can be recycled under the Oregon Bottle Bill declined slightly.
Secondly I will have to forgive others and seek their forgiveness.
Secondly, understand that there are no secrets and shortcuts to success.
Secondly, the theological properties of the polydimethylsiloxane melt used for SRM 2491 exhibit less temperature dependence compared to the solution used for SRM 2490.
Secondly, changes in the Oji Paper Group's business structure will include the transfer and unification of more than ten operation offices.
First, Cope and Leisenring's past affiliation with the FASB and secondly, Leisenring's background.
Secondly, I want them to believe in their innate goodness as young people.
Secondly, her aim is to examine the influence of chivalric fiction on the ethics of medieval and Renaissance European explorers and conquistadores, especially those who composed their own narratives of exploration.