seize

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seize

1 to take legal possession of someone or something.
2 to take into custody.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1: Total seizable offences 1991-2004 (Singapore Police Force, 2000/2001, 2005) 1991 51,817 1992 49,983 1993 46,670 1994 43,131 1995 43,123 1996 41,542 1997 39,392 1998 42,297 1999 35,982 2000 32,412 2001 29,077 2002 31,847 2003 33,458 2004 34,480 Note: Table made from line graph.
(72) This Comment will use the term "digital plain view" to refer to any evidence encountered while searching digital media that, while not responsive to the warrant permitting the search, is nonetheless seizable in a manner similar to evidence encountered in traditional plain view situations such as Coolidge v.
The Court in Daccarett had determined EFT to be property by saying, "an EFT while it takes the form of a bank credit at an intermediary bank is clearly a seizable res under the forfeiture statutes." (120) The Court in Winter Storm found Daccarett particularly relevant because "the attachments of funds in Daccarett were accomplished pursuant to the Admiralty Rules, incorporated by reference into the forfeiture statute." 121 Thus, Winter Storm concluded that:
The exceptions are: (1) searches of abandoned property; (2) searches in hot pursuit of a fleeing felon; (3) searches, with probable cause, to avoid destruction of a known seizable item; (4) searches, with probable cause, of a movable vehicle; (5)inventory searches; (6)searches pursuant to voluntary consent; (7) searches in the rendition of "emergency aid"; (8) Terry 'reasonable suspicion' investigatory stops: and (9) searches incident to an arrest.
They had identified seizable assets of pounds 27,307.
Judge James Pyke had earlier ruled that Hawkins' benefit from drug trafficking had been pounds 181,000 and that he had seizable assets, including his home, of pounds 91,941.
`What's your first memory?' someone would ask Martha Cochrane, the main character in .Julian Barnes' novel England, England (1998), but because for Martha a memory was not `a solid, seizable thing, which time, in its plodding, humorous way, might decorate down the years with fanciful detail ...
The Court went on to conclude that "[n]o reason is apparent why an object should routinely be seizable on lesser grounds, during an unrelated search and seizure, than would have been needed to obtain a warrant for that same object if it had been known to be on the premises." Id.
Believes that the feminine subtext in AA "silently gestures toward the deconstructive madness of the imposed order." Finds that most critics do not believe Rosa's story to be the "seizable authority" in the novel, but rather assume that Mr.
The Court held that the resulting seizure of crack cocaine would have been constitutional if this "plain touch" had given rise to probable cause to believe that the defendant possessed seizable evidence, because the defendant would not have suffered any invasion beyond the legitimate invasion inherent in the frisk.