self-serving


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self-serving

adj. referring to a question asked of a party to a lawsuit or a statement by that person that serves no purpose and provides no evidence, but only argues or reinforces the legal position of that party. Example: Question asked by a lawyer of his own client: "Are you the sort of person who would never do anything dishonest?" Such a question may be objected to as "self-serving" by the opposing lawyer, and then will be disallowed by the judge, unless there is some evidentiary value. Some people add self-serving comments to their testimony, such as "I never tell lies," which can be stricken from the record as a self-serving declaration. (See: objection)

References in periodicals archive ?
88% of those who are self-serving believe that doing their best is not enough - they need to Be the best (compared to 26% of the responsible group).
96% of those who are self-serving dislike being outperformed by others, compared to 31% of the responsible group.
81% of those who are self-serving believe that being in a position of power is the only way they can gain the respect of others, compared to 1% of the responsible group.
96% of those who are self-serving believe that being in a position of power means that they are superior to others, compared to 1% of the responsible group.
89% of those who are self-serving stated that they are much more confident in a position of authority than when they are expected to follow, compared to 1% of the responsible group.