References in classic literature ?
A secret enemy had been continually by his side, under the semblance of a friend and helper, and had availed himself of the opportunities thus afforded for tampering with the delicate springs of Mr.
Have another Scotch, and let semblance and deception become duck-weed on a river.
The effect of this was magical: the words, intended as a mark of civility, were received as a flattering compliment; her countenance brightened up, and from that moment she became as gracious and benign as heart could wish--in outward semblance at least.
Finally the captains came, armored cap-a-pie, and with them some semblance of order and quiet out of chaos and bedlam.
Here we have religion and robbery the allies of each other --devils dressed in angels' robes, and hell presenting the semblance of paradise.
The Lacedaemonians, to gratify their allies, and yet preserve the semblance of an adherence to their ancient institutions, had recourse to the flimsy subterfuge of investing Lysander with the real power of admiral, under the nominal title of vice-admiral.
It is wonderful how soon he transformed this rough mob of country people into the semblance of a regular army.
There was such fascination in her pluck, nimbleness, the continual exhibition of unfailing seaworthiness, in the semblance of courage and endurance, that I could not give up the delight of watching her run through the three unforgettable days of that gale which my mate also delighted to extol as "a famous shove.
The countless dismal windows, vacant and forlorn, stared, sightless, from their marble walls; the whole sad city taking on the semblance of scattered mounds of dead men's sun-bleached skulls--the casements having the appearance of eyeless sockets, the portals, grinning jaws.
It was a woman's love which kept Tarzan even to the semblance of civilization--a condition for which familiarity had bred contempt.
Meanwhile, Countdown veterans Susie Dent and Rachel Riley try to keep up some semblance of order.
Drawing on the language of the "postmodern dichotomy," Theodor Adorno's philosophical aesthetics, and recent Anglophone philosophy, he argues that the successful Holocaust artwork "must both maintain and disintegrate aesthetic semblance in a negative-dialectical relationship in which aesthetic and historical elements, processes, properties constitute the artwork without achieving a harmonious, dialectically synthesized unity.