sensationalism

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Anyone reading this sensationalist journalism would think that nobody dares to walk the streets of the old town at night for fear of being assaulted by a gang of marauding Muslims.
The problem of gang culture is a complex one and sensationalist headlines and soundbites contribute nothing to its solution.
Joseph Pulitzer's New York WORLD flourished at the turn of the 20th century and grew from a modern daily paper to a sensationalist publication packed with striking colorful art, from photos to cartoons and drawings.
Britain's sensationalist press also weighed in with "Big Brother" headlines.
This is not sensationalist work; this is not salacious work,'' she continued.
it's a humor title which also is based on the Weekly World News gossip publication's impossible, sensationalist headlines--and it provides tongue-in-cheek commentary on celebrities, culture, politics, alien abductions and more within its pages of 'impossible events'.
Reality TV programmes also had sensationalist coverage of cosmetic surgery, the organisation said.
Frustrated with the sensationalist media coverage and worried about its effect on the emerging rap industry, journalist Nelson George, Jive A & R exec Ann Carli, publicist Leyla Turkkan and a number of execs met the following week.
As to subject matter, there were the expected Hirst overdoses of drugs (Addicted to Crack, Abandoned by Society, 2004-2005), medical horror (Autopsy with Sliced Human Brain, 2004), and sensationalist topicality (Suicide Bomber [Aftermath], 2004-2005), but all had uniformly passed from hot to lukewarm.
One of the earliest sensationalist works was a German pamphlet describing the horrific hatchet murders of four children by their mother (and her immediate suicide), written by Lutheran minister Burkard Waldis in 1551:
They turn the criticism back onto the media themselves, claiming that media coverage of DCF is sensationalist and shallow.
By 1924, the contest and the paper's sensationalist treatment of crime and celebrities, accompanied by copious photographs, had made the Daily News, with a circulation of 750,000, the largest newspaper in the nation.