sentence

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sentence

1) n. the punishment given to a person convicted of a crime. A sentence is ordered by the judge, based on the verdict of the jury (or the judge's verdict if there was no jury) within the possible punishments set by state law (or Federal law in convictions for a Federal crime). Popularly, "sentence" refers to the jail or prison time ordered after conviction, as in "his sentence was 10 years in state prison." Technically, a sentence includes all fines, community service, restitution or other punishment, or terms of probation. Defendants who are first offenders without a felony record may be entitled to a probation or pre-sentence report by a probation officer based on background information and circumstances of the crime, often resulting in a recommendation as to probation and amount of punishment. For misdemeanors (lesser crimes) the maximum sentence is usually one year in county jail, but for felonies (major crimes) the sentence can range from a year to the death penalty for murder in most states. Under some circumstances the defendant may receive a "suspended sentence" which means the punishment is not imposed if the defendant does not get into other trouble for the period he/she would have spent in jail or prison, "concurrent sentences" in which the prison time for more than one crime is served at the same time and only lasts as long as the longest term, "consecutive sentences," in which the terms for several crimes are served one after another, and "indeterminate" sentences in which the actual release date is not set and will be based on review of prison conduct. (See: concurrent sentence, suspended sentence, indeterminate sentence, restitution, death penalty)

sentence

noun adjudication, award of punishment, censure, conviction, decision, declaration of penalty, decree of punishment, decretum, determination, determined punnshment, doom, edict, formally pronounced judgment, order of penalty, order of the court, penalty, prescribed punishment, pronouncement, punishment, ruling, verdict
Associated concepts: concurrent sentences, consecutive sentences, cumulative sentences, excessive sentence, indeeerminative sentence, life sentence, presentence hearing, suspended sentence

sentence

verb adjudge, bring in a verdict, commit, condemn, condemnare, convict, damnare, decide, declare guilty of an offense, decree, determine, find, find guilty, hold, immure, impose penalty, imprison, inflict penalty, order, pass judgment upon, prescribe punishment, prooounce guilty, pronounce judgment, proscribe, reprobate
Associated concepts: presentence report
See also: adjudge, adjudication, clause, condemn, condemnation, convict, conviction, decide, decree, determination, discipline, finding, finding of guilt, holding, judge, judgment, opinion, penalize, penalty, punish, punishment, ruling, verdict

SENTENCE. A judgment, or judicial declaration made by a judge in a cause. The term judgment is more usually applied to civil, and sentence to criminal proceedings.
     2. Sentences are final, when they put, an end to the case; or interlocutory, when they settle only some incidental matter which has arisen in the course of its progress. Vide Aso & Man. Inst. B. 3, t. 8, c. 1.

References in periodicals archive ?
We call the operation of successively applying productions starting from the sentential form S and terminating at a string u [member of] T* a derivation of u.
Moreover, the fact that the association of generic meanings with ser was stronger when the sentential subject was animate and the adjective was scalar suggests that factors such as type of adjective and animacy predispose children to interpret sentences with ser as generic.
This is, in fact, the first sentential occurrence of the name Sherlock Holmes in Doyle's novel A Study in Scarlet.
One central point that it is important to recognize here is that this second sense of correspondence involves a shift in focus from propositional truth (as in the first sense of correspondence) to sentential truth, since the relevant picturing is supposedly something that linguistic objects do.
This property has led some authors to assume that sentential complementation provides the necessary format to represent false beliefs.
13) This is because the notion of an object sequence allows us to construe sentential truth as merely a special case of predicate satisfaction (i.
At various points in this paper, hints have already been given as to the existence of a parallelism between DPs and CPs, or differently between the nominal and the sentential behaviour of grammatical units including a wh-element.
7) As far as syntax is concerned and in accordance to this semantic evolution, OE behofian ('need') favoured nominative experiencers (like tharf and betharf) and nominal themes, while its ME reflex, behoven ('is appropriate'), preferred non-nominative experiencers and sentential themes, with or without a formal subject it, as in It byhoveth the to ben obeisaunt 'It behoves you to be obedient' (112).
The conjunctions highlighted above give a sort of inter sentential cohesion to the paper under consideration and this enhances interpretation.
According to the Atlantic Sentential, this will be Aoa measly three month extension of the settlement moratorium that originally expired in late September.
According to the Atlantic Sentential, this will be "a measly three month extension of the settlement moratorium that originally expired in late September.
He introduces the symbolic logic most courses and texts emphasize, but also other areas of logic, such as sentential and predicate logic, probability and inductive logic, inference to the best explanation, and topics in informal logic such as fallacy detection and learning how to penetrate the fog of political rhetoric and spin.