sequester

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sequester

v. to keep separate or apart. In so-called "high-profile" criminal prosecutions (involving major crimes, events, or persons given wide publicity) the jury is sometimes "sequestered" in a hotel without access to news media, the general public or their families except under supervision, in order to prevent the jury from being "tainted" by information or opinions about the trial outside of the evidence in the courtroom. A witness may be sequestered from hearing the testimony of other witnesses, commonly called being "excluded," until after he/she has testified, supposedly to prevent that witness from being influenced by other evidence or tailoring his/her testimony to fit the stories of others. (See: sequestration)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

sequester

1 the practice, prevalent in the USA, of keeping juries sealed up during sensational trials. In this way they do not have access to prejudicial materials or contacts.
2 to take (property) temporarily out of the possession of its owner, until the claims of creditors are satisfied or a court order is complied with.
3 in international law, to requisition or appropriate enemy property.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

TO SEQUESTER, civil and eccl. law. To renounce. Example, when a widow comes into court and disclaims having anything to do, or to intermeddle with her deceased husband's estate, she is said to sequester. Jacob, L. D. h.t.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
One hectare can contain 50 tonnes of living microorganisms [that are sequestering carbon].
The 2 community mitigation strategies modeled were school closings with home sequestering of children and teenagers [less than or equal to] 18 years of age (hereafter called child sequestering) and home sequestering of all community members (hereafter called community sequestering).
Control scenarios are an unmitigated base case (epidemics without mitigation strategies implemented) or continuation of strategies for the epidemic duration (child sequestering or community sequestering implemented at the 10-diagnosed case trigger and ended when the last incident case is recovered or dead).
He calculated from the soil test and other results that the perennial grasses and tagasaste were sequestering 7 t/ha of C[O.sub.2] per year more than traditional annual pastures.
Geological storage involves sequestering C[O.sub.2] in rocks.
However, he says, "I do have to say that of the many technologies we've looked at for capturing and sequestering C[O.sub.2], the CES technology seems the best and most economical to produce pure C[O.sub.2].
Typically, as with other pandemic models, the authors model different rates of compliance, but each rate is assumed to remain static for the duration of sequestering (e.g., 50% compliance during 40 days of sequestering).
But wood products--lumber--help by sequestering carbon while replacing steel, concrete, and plastics, the manufacture of which is more fossil fuel intensive.
States like Iowa and Wisconsin are leading the way in preliminary research, studying how farmers could be convinced that sequestering soil beneath their fields is in their best interests.
Even if successful at sequestering carbon, fertilizing the ocean could have unintended consequences.
Few companies today are willing to take on the extra expense of separating and sequestering carbon dioxide, but researchers are working on techniques to boost the efficiency of the process and lessen its cost (see sidebar).
This disturbing conclusion emerges from a study of how tiny ocean plants called plankton affect the sequestering of carbon dioxide in the northeastern Atlantic.