cloud

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cloud on title (cloud)

n. an actual or apparent outstanding claim on the title to real property. "Clouds" can include an old mortgage or deed of trust with no recording showing the secured debt was paid off, a failure to properly transfer all interests in the real property (such as mineral rights) to a former owner, a previous deed which was improperly written or signed, an unresolved legal debt or levy by a creditor or a taxing authority, or some other doubtful link in the chain of title. Often the "cloud" can be removed by a quiet title action, by finding a person to create or execute a document to prove a debt had been paid or corrected. Title companies will refuse to insure title to be transferred with a "cloud," or they will insure ownership except for ("insure around") the "cloud." (See: chain of title, quiet title action, mortgage, deed of trust, reconveyance, title, title report)

cloud

(Incumbrance), noun burden, charge, claim, claim on property, commitment, debt, hold on property, hypothecation, indebtedness, indebtment, liability, obligation, obstruction, outstanding debt, pignus juuiciale, pignus legale, pledge, prescription, real security, restraint, security, security on property, state of indebteddess, vadium mortuum
Associated concepts: a cloud on personalty, a cloud on real property

cloud

(Suspicion), noun apprehension, consternation, contestability, controvertibility, disbelief, disputability, distrust, distrustfulness, doubt, fear, hesitation, incredulity, incredulousness, lack of certainty, lack of confidence, lack of faith, misgiving, mistrust, mistrustfulness, onus probandi, perplexity, puzzlement, questionability, refusal to believe, refutability, reluctance to believe, skepticism, trepidation, unbelief, uncredulousness, want of certainty, want of confiience, want of faith
See also: blind, camouflage, cloak, damper, ensconce, enshroud, hide, muddle, obfuscate, obnubilate, obscuration, obscure, tarnish, veil
References in classic literature ?
Creakle, that Twenty Seven and Twenty Eight were perfectly consistent and unchanged; that exactly what they were then, they had always been; that the hypocritical knaves were just the subjects to make that sort of profession in such a place; that they knew its market-value at least as well as we did, in the immediate service it would do them when they were expatriated; in a word, that it was a rotten, hollow, painfully suggestive piece of business altogether.
Soon after this, the king and his seven friends having reeled about the hall in all directions, found themselves, at length, in its centre, and, of course, in immediate contact with the chain.
It came from the fang -- like teeth of the dwarf, who ground them and gnashed them as he foamed at the mouth, and glared, with an expression of maniacal rage, into the upturned countenances of the king and his seven companions.
They are a great king and his seven privy-councillors, -- a king who does not scruple to strike a defenceless girl and his seven councillors who abet him in the outrage.
Thus early had that one guest,--the only guest who is certain, at one time or another, to find his way into every human dwelling, --thus early had Death stepped across the threshold of the House of the Seven Gables!
Now the Seven Gables will be new-shingled!" From father to son, they clung to the ancestral house with singular tenacity of home attachment.
We have already hinted that it is not our purpose to trace down the history of the Pyncheon family, in its unbroken connection with the House of the Seven Gables; nor to show, as in a magic picture, how the rustiness and infirmity of age gathered over the venerable house itself.
During the Revolution, the Pyncheon of that epoch, adopting the royal side, became a refugee; but repented, and made his reappearance, just at the point of time to preserve the House of the Seven Gables from confiscation.
"At a few minutes to seven," returned the duke (suiting the action to the words), "I raise the crust of the pie; I find in it two poniards, a ladder of rope, and a gag.
"Seven o'clock!" said Grimaud, who had not spoken a word.
answered Zarathustra, and smiled once more, how well do ye know what had to be fulfilled in seven days:--
"How well ye know what consolation I devised for myself in seven days!