shade

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Related to shades: Lowes
References in classic literature ?
For they could distinguish the shade sufficiently to see that it wore a cloak which shrouded it from head to foot.
At this moment the abbe pressed down his side of the shade and so raised it on the other, throwing a bright light on the stranger's face, while his own remained obscured.
Now, were these shades of green, belonging to tropical vegetation, kept up by a low dense atmosphere?
The little winding paths, cool from the surrounding shade, led to the scattered houses; the owners of which everywhere gave us a cheerful and most hospitable reception.
So Ole jumped down and crawled under one of the wagons for shade, and the tramp got on the machine.
We had very good fun in the free meadows, galloping up and down and chasing each other round and round the field; then standing still under the shade of the trees.
I'll take three hundred cakes, and that will give them shade and all.
Knightley had another reason for avoiding a table in the shade.
The oaks will yield us their sweet fruit with bountiful hand, the trunks of the hard cork trees a seat, the willows shade, the roses perfume, the widespread meadows carpets tinted with a thousand dyes; the clear pure air will give us breath, the moon and stars lighten the darkness of the night for us, song shall be our delight, lamenting our joy, Apollo will supply us with verses, and love with conceits whereby we shall make ourselves famed for ever, not only in this but in ages to come.
On the other hand in the case of (2) the Physician, though I shall here also see a line (D'A'E') with a bright centre (A'), yet it will shade away LESS RAPIDLY into dimness, because the sides(A'C', A'B') RECEDE LESS RAPIDLY INTO THE FOG: and what appear to me the Physician's extremities, viz.
Under the shade of a wild rose sat the Queen and her little Maids of Honor, beside the silvery mushroom where the feast was spread.
Hooper's eyes were so weakened by the midnight lamp, as to require a shade.