Sheep

(redirected from sheeplike)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to sheeplike: sheepishly

SHEEP. A wether more than a year old. 4 Car. & Payne, 216; 19 Eng. Com. Law Rep. 331, S. C.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
In taut, gripping and deeply disturbing fashion, writer-director Craig Zobel measures the depths to which rational individuals will sink to obey a self-anointed authority figure in "Compliance." Based on a series of real-life prank calls reported at fast-food restaurants nationwide, this stealth psychological horror film is at once tough to turn away from and, by design, extremely difficult to watch as it grimly assesses the human capacity for sheeplike naivete under duress.
Perhaps there was a time before TV when travel really did broaden the mind but watching herds of sheeplike tourists gawping at some bricks, you might be inclined to think Karl is the sane one here.
But rare mangalitsa pigs, the kind fooling zoogoers in the U.K., were bred in Austria and Hungary to have sheeplike coats.
In interpreting the creature, it is with playful tongue in one's cheek that we note the sheeplike top-crop of woolly hair, assumedly white, perched on the head of this "white" rhino (note the wide lip).
Hart famously suggested that a society comprising laws not accepted by the community 'might be deplorably sheeplike; the sheep might end in the slaughter-house': H LA Hart, The Concept of Law (1961) 114.
One item called Prankety Prank saw an unsuspecting member of the sheeplike audience face a panel of C-list celebrities - cue Jim Bowen.
I responded, "Jesus calls us to be sheep among wolves, so that the wolves become sheeplike. If we are wolves among wolves, we destroy one another."
But schools themselves are antidemocratic and bear great responsibility for the sheeplike behavior of our compatriots.
Instead of art serving you, you serve art--and with a sheeplike docility you let it impede your development, and you let if push you into the hell of indolence.
Jeffersonian vigilance, for example, has deep roots in Machiavelli's efforts to turn sheeplike citizens into wolves policing the state against tyranny with a "little rebellion now and then," and Madison's famous theory of "opposite and rival interests" (what we call pluralism today), not to mention Adam Smith's invisible hand, has an uncanny resemblance to the public benefit Machiavelli saw arising from the self-interested conflict between Roman plebs and patricians.
Lapham doesn't say "promoting their ideas" for it is part of his gospel that conservatives don't have ideas, only--here he quotes Lionel Trilling--"irritable mental gestures which seek to resemble ideas." But all that money wouldn't have had its desired effect unless the American public, sheeplike, was susceptible to this horrible assault on its freedoms and interests.