shortness


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Related to shortness: shortness of breath
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A If the shortness of breath is linked to weight then we can offer advice on healthy weight loss, which would help to alleviate the symptom.
She said that smokers with COPD have higher death rates than nonsmokers with COPD and patients also have more frequent respiratory symptoms (coughing, shortness of breath, etc.
2] exposures with the prevalence of wheeze and shortness of breath in cohorts as a whole and in potentially vulnerable population subgroups.
We also found a significant association between decreased lung function with combinations of more than one chronic symptom, where lung function decreased with the addition of more than one symptom (cough + phlegm + wheeze + shortness of breath grade 2).
For some COPD patients, a chronic cough and shortness of breath may be considered bothersome, but not a cause for serious concern.
It could be: In this day and age, the most common cause of shortness of breath (SOB) is obesity - your heart and lungs can't cope with your body weight.
Commenting on Zahra's case, Dr Kanojia said that the patient experienced backache and shortness of breath a couple of times earlier, which she treated with analgesics and felt better, but this time the pain was severe, rushing her to emergency.
Women are more likely than men to have heart attack symptoms unrelated to chest pain which include neck, shoulder, upper back or abdominal discomfort, shortness of breath, nausea or vomiting, sweating, lightheadedness or dizziness or unusual fatigue.
The BLAZE study showed that after six weeks of treatment, QVA149 significantly improved patient self-reported shortness of breath during daily activities versus both placebo (p
King Bio's AsthmaCare promises temporary relief from minor shortness of breath, wheezing and tightness in the chest due to bronchial congestion or allergic reactions.
A study of 235 British women found 34 per cent were living with high levels of pain and other uncontrolled symptoms, 27 per cent had shortness of breath and 26 per cent experienced nausea.
The study, funded by Breast Cancer Campaign, of 235 British women found 34 per cent were living with high levels of pain and other uncontrolled symptoms, 27 per cent had shortness of breath and 26 per cent experienced nausea.