Brother

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BROTHER, domest. relat. He who is born from the same father and mother with another, or from one of them only.
     2. Brothers are of the whole blood, when they are born of the same father and mother, and of the half blood, when they are the issue of one of them only.
     3. In the civil law, when they are the children of the same father and mother, they are called brothers germain; when they descend from the same father, but not the same mother, they are consanguine brothers; when they are the issue of the same mother, but not the same father, they are uterine brothers. A half brother, is one who is born of the same father or mother, but not of both. One born of the same parents before they were married, a left-sided brother; and a bastard born of the same father or mother, is called a natural brother. Vide Blood; Half-blood; Line; and Merl. Repert. mot Frere; Dict. de Jurisp. mot Frere; Code, 3, 28, 27 Nov. 84, praef; Dane's Ab. Index, h. t.

References in periodicals archive ?
Fostering siblings is a very rewarding experience that can enrich your life.
Children with autism were still more likely to be involved in two-way sibling bullying, as a victim and a perpetrator.
Although many findings have revealed the important impact of a sibling relationship on children's mental health, most researchers did not control for the influence of both the child and the parent characteristics.
"We recognize the value of the Beads of Courage Sibling program in acknowledging the courage of brothers and sisters who are impacted by a sibling's life-threatening illness," said Melissa Scarcelli, the children's mother.
Here are 10 quotes about siblings, collected from (https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/sisters?page=4) Good Reads and (https://www.romper.com/p/25-quotes-about-siblings-to-share-on-national-sibling-day-every-day-8575) Romper , which can be shared with family -
It's important to let the primary caregiver sibling know you appreciate everything he or she does for Mom and Dad and you're all in this together.
I believe that many other siblings experience something like this too."
In my experience, sibling rivalry is uncommon among kids whose parents work full time.
By nurturing and maintaining sibling contact, we know children are better able to lead healthy, safe and happy lives.
Children without a disability share common interests with a sibling(s) via games and often include the sibling with special needs in the game.
Pamela See, an educational and developmental psychologist at Th!nk Psychological Services, listed other signs that a rivalry is taking a turn for the worse: If it is starting to stress the whole family, or if one child purposefully disagrees with whatever his sibling says or does, or if they show aggression towards each other, it is a sign that things are on a downward spiral.
In response, the sibling relationship has become a more popular area of psychoanalytic inquiry in the last two decades due to greater acknowledgement of the significance of sibling relationships in development and their centrality in family experiences (Bank & Kahn, 1982; Charles, 1999; Coles, 2003; Mitchell, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2013b; Neubauer, 1983; Parens, 1988; Sharpe & Rosenblatt, 1994; Whiteman, McHale & Soli, 2011).