silly

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Related to silliness: sullenness
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I got a bit of ball in hand, but it was probably overshadowed by the silliness of the yellow card," Henderson said.
Reaching a verdict and fining the defendant a mere BD1 explains the silliness of the case but how do you justify keeping this poor man in custody for 22 days?
But amidst all the silliness there's a serious message - of hope, not glory.
Spamalot at Sunderland Empire until Saturday SILLINESS is at large on Wearside with Spamalot, the musical "lovingly ripped off" from Monty Python and The Holy Grail, at the Empire all week.
Being asked on to do a musical number must also be a bit of a relief for some of the stars, as they're generally not required to get involved so much with Graham's trademark silliness.
It seems that you either get its mix of silliness, slapstick, catchphrases and "You Have Been Watching" credit sequences, or you're left wondering if you've accidentally flicked over to a repeat of a longforgotten 1970s comedy on GOLD.
Stephen Wallis should be fighting tooth and claw to preserve this meeting, not capitulating so meekly in the face of the silliness that is Racing For Change.
While Emmerdale goes to the opposite extreme with its silliness, at least the comic capers of the Dingles offer some much-needed light relief.
Not to be outdone, Snoop Dogg, normally a dapperly dressed rapper, decided to do his bit for silliness with a stetson.
Put a man - of natural silliness factor, say, of about seven - into an environment where he is required to indulge himself in stimulating conversation and respectable conduct, and that God-given flair will retreat to the very peripheries of his mind.
It's being staged in a remodeled theater that once presented "Avenue Q," but there is hope that the broad humor and familiar silliness of the story will result in a much different fate.
In an August report reviewing that decade of research, the American Psychological Association finds a rich legacy of bureaucratic silliness but little evidence that the rules benefit the kids they're supposed to protect.