Situs

(redirected from site)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Situs

[Latin, Situation; location.] The place where a particular event occurs.

For example, the situs of a crime is the place where it was committed; the situs of a trust is the location where the trustee performs his or her duties of managing the trust.

situs

n. Latin for location, be it where the crime or accident took place or where the building stands.

SITUS. Situation;, location. 5 Pet. R. 524.
     2. Real estate has always a fixed situs, while personal estate has no such fixed situs; the law rei site regulates real but not the personal estate. Story, Confl. of Laws, Sec. 379.

References in periodicals archive ?
The focus then turned to pragmatic issues, like identifying your software objectives and locating potential content contributors and editorial board members for your site. Pricing strategies and merchant account tips rounded out the afternoon.
Cope in Henrico County adds that a team of technicians watch over student Web site traffic.
* For information about the science of blindness, visit the Web site of the American Foundation for the Blind: www.afb.org
The iNova Awards, which honor excellence in corporate Web sites, gave the company's consumer Web site, www.coldwellbanker.com, a Gold, and the company's intranet site, CBNet, a Silver.
Two hundred thousand people may not seem like many for a site gaining 250,000 new users per day.
And while the tendency is to leave well enough alone, doing so means you're probably not using your site to its fullest potential.
Conjectures about Site Qbegan about 40 years ago, when carved panels and other glyph-bearing artifacts of apparently Maya origin flooded the antiquities market.
One lesson from KissKissKiss was that aggregating content and maintaining mobile sites was very time-consuming, because there was no tool on the Japanese market that could automate the full process of site management.
Officials at Hertlin House, a senior retirement community in Lake Ronkonkoma, N.Y., recently decided to update their Web site after realizing that more of their residents were relying on the Internet for research.
* Making sure that each site has its own copy of the data so that if one site is lost, the applications can continue
Timothy Sprehe found many disparities where dynamic Web site contents (records) were more up-to-date than the "official" records.