skimpy

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5 Slim, sleek, sexy: The Casio Exilim EX-S500 five-megapixel camera ($400) does not skimp on features and comes in a choice of three colors to suit what hues you think are most flattering to your gift-getter.
That said, Beck is never one to skimp on entertainment, with his very own Bez in the form of a manic but dapper dancer.
9 grams of carbs, the Bremen, Germany-brewed beer promises not to skimp on the authentic import taste that comes from strict adherence to the German Purity Law of 1516.
It's refreshing to read a title from the past which doesn't skimp on the lard or the fats, and intriguing to read about Estes' Southern childhood and early years as a railway attendant, while the easy recipes for Baked Milk (an early form of custard), or Parsnip Fritters.
Too individualistic to share and coordinate with an entire band, but not wanting to skimp on the fineries of making three or more things go strum, boom, rattle at the same time.
If you skimp on this stage, your memory will become impaired.
In a recent report, Britain's Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA), the world's largest beer consumer group, asserts that the consolidation of Czech breweries under foreign ownership is having a detrimental effect on Czech beers, as the new managers skimp on ingredients and alter long-established brewing methods.
This novel doesn't skimp on any of the drama associated with being a teenager in today's hectic society.
So even on a "budget," Lamborghini--whose bull emblem signifies "power, aggression and courage"--doesn't skimp under the hood.
If you're planning an effort that will last three hours or more and the conditions may be hot and humid, don't skimp on salt in your regular diet, and consider carrying a small pack of pretzels to help maintain normal blood levels of sodium.
Constructed with less plastic to alleviate tired, cold, and sore feet, this design does not skimp on performance.
DON'T SKIMP ON SNOOZING: A new study shows that people learn a new skill much better after more than six and preferably eight hours of sleep.