test

(redirected from skin tests)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to skin tests: allergy skin test

test

noun analysis, audit, check, checkup, effort, examination, experience, experiment, exploration, inquest, inquiry, inquisition, inspection, interrogation, observation, questioning, quiz, research, scrutiny, search, study, survey, trial, try, tryout
Associated concepts: blood test, clear and present danger test, compelling state interest test, prudent man test, right from wrong test, substantial evidence test
See also: attempt, canon, check, criterion, endeavor, experiment, indagation, inquiry, poll, question, research, survey, trial, try, venture

TEST. Something by which to ascertain the truth respecting another thing. 7 Penn. St. Rep. 428; 6 Whart. 284. Vide Religious Test.

References in periodicals archive ?
Paul Reardon, 64, who runs the salon with his wife Donna and their 10 members of staff, said: "We skin test everybody.
This study was undertaken to investigate skin autoreactivity in chronic idiopathic urticaria by using plasma anticoagulated with sodium citrate and compare autologous plasma skin test (APST) with autologous serum skin test (ASST).
The tuberculin skin test remains the recommended TB assay in the 2010 Red Book, Dr.
They reported that 44% of the atopic women and 34% of the atopic men had positive skin tests with cockroach allergen.
Skin tests with zinc applications were significantly more likely to have positive results than the simultaneous contralateral control skin tests with placebo cream applications (94% zinc vs.
However, this test has its problems: difficulty in accurately measuring and interpreting the reaction; low sensitivity in those with depressed cell-mediated immunity and those with early infections; lower specificity in those with a history of bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination and infection with other Mycobacteria; the need for 2 visits within 48 to 72 hours for test interpretation; and boosting of immune response caused by the TB skin test itself (see Boosting phenomena).
The existing tuberculin skin test developed in the 1890s uses injections delivered through six tiny prongs, usually on the forearm, and requires patients to return to their physician to interpret results.
The use of the Gamma Interferon blood test will be piloted in certain areas alongside the traditional tuberculin skin tests in cattle, and there will be a wider application of the ``severe interpretation'' of skin test results.
Bailey of the University of Alabama at Birmingham and his associates developed a model to predict the 20%-30% of patient contacts who are likely to have positive tuberculosis skin tests.
It takes 72 hours for scientists to read the results of tuberculosis skin tests.
During the initial 3 months of treatment, these patients had undergone a total of 105,000 intradermal skin tests and had received a total of 21,600 allergy injections.