SLAB

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SLAB

abbreviation for SCOTTISH LEGAL AID BOARD.
References in classic literature ?
He drew a sovereign from his pocket and threw it down upon the slab, turning away with the air of a man whose disgust is too deep for words.
The smallest he-baby stumbled over one of the sepulchral slabs so much admired by Mr.
the slab where Marcel cut the throats of Robert de Clermont and the Marshal of Champagne, in the presence of the dauphin?
The solid ersite slabs she could not even scratch; the tough Barsoomian glass of the windows would have shattered to nothing less than a heavy sledge in the hands of a strong man.
Before the dawn of European art he believed that the primitive huntsmen and priests had built temples of massive stone slabs, had formed out of the dark rocks and the great cedar trees majestic figures of gods and of beasts, and symbols of the great forces, water, air, and forest among which they lived.
At least we cannot afford to arouse his suspicions"; and so they followed him--followed along winding corridors and through many chambers, until they came at last to a room in which there were several marble slabs raised upon pedestals some three feet above the floor and upon each slab lay a human corpse.
The wall at this point was constructed entirely, it seemed, of these almost perfect slabs.
I'll sit on one of those old slabs and shut my eyes and imagine I'm in the Avonlea woods.
A raised platform of forest slabs, six feet wide, with a slight pitch, extended the full length of the shed.
The first and second wives lay in the graveyard, under the white coral sand, with slabs of coral rock at head and feet.
The sidewalks were superb marble slabs polished as smooth as glass, and the curbs that separated the walks from the broad street were also set thick with clustered emeralds.
The carved pedestals were black with use, the wooden seats were worn hollow, the floor of stone slabs was polished by the contact of possibly millions of naked feet and worn away in the aisles between the pedestals so that the latter rested upon little mounds of stone several inches above the general level of the floor.