Slave trade

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SLAVE TRADE, criminal law. The infamous traffic in human flesh, which though not prohibited by the law of nations, is now forbidden by the laws and treaties of most civilized states.
     2. By the constitution of the United States, art. 1, s. 9, it is provided, that the "migration or importation of such persons as any of the states now existing (in 1789,) shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the congress, prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight." Previously to that date several laws were enacted, which it is not within the plan of this work to cite at large or to analyze; they are here referred to, namely; act of 1794, c. 11, 1 Story's laws U. S. 319; act of 1800, c. 51, 1 Story's Laws U. S. 780 act of 1803, c. 63, 2 Story's Laws U. S 886; act of 1807, c. 77, 2 Story's Laws U. S. 1050; these several acts forbid citizens of the United States, under certain circumstances, to equip or build vessels for the purpose of carrying on the slave trade, and the last mentioned act makes it highly penal to import slaves into the United States after the first day of January, 1808. The act of 1818, c. 86, 3 Story's Laws U. S. 1698 the act of 1819, c. 224, 3 Story's Laws U. S. 1752; and the act of 1820, c. 113, 3 Story's Laws U. S. 1798, contain further prohibition of the slave trade, and punish tho violation of their several provisions with the highest penalties of the law. Vide, generally, 10 Wheat. R. 66; 2 Mason, R. 409; 1 Acton, 240; 1 Dodson, 81, 91, 95; 2 Dodson, 238; 6 Mass. R. 358; 2 Cranch, 336; 3 Dall. R. 297; 1 Wash. C. C. Rep. 522; 4 Id. 91; 3 Mason, R. 175; 9 Wheat. R. 391; 6 Cranch, 330; 5 Wheat. R. 338; 8 Id. 380; 10 Id. 312; 1 Kent, Com. 191.

References in periodicals archive ?
traders began to serve testifies to the rising status of the United States relative to the British and Portuguese, the major slave-trading powers.
naval vessels and port authorities together detained a total of only five vessels for slave-trading activities, an average of less than one a year.
Eltis and Richardson have thus cleared the way for scholars who wish to push further the study of the slave trade in two key directions--toward documenting the organization and effects of slave-trading networks within Africa itself and uncovering the experiences of perhaps one-fifth of those who arrived in the New World as captives and were subsequently resold and reshipped through slave-trading circuits in the Americas.
Walvin treats Equiano's Interesting Narrative (1789) by relating it point by point to recent scholarship on West African slaveholding and slave-trading societies, the Atlantic slave trade, New World slavery, Anglo-American commerce, British politics, and the nascent abolitionism of the 1780s.