slovenly

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His father would never have brooked such slovenliness, and Mrs.
Working my shift at a major metropolitan institution the other day, I was struck once again, as I so often am, by the appalling appearance of the new American public: an ungodly combination of infantilism and brutality, narcissism and slovenliness, seductiveness and aggressive physical repulsion, an utter lack of taste--all of it compounded by bad grammar, lewd language, and worse manners, resulting, more often than not, from an anti-social self-unawareness and a lack of tact and consideration for other people.
The unwillingness and inability to make distinctions invites a certain coarseness of manners--mobile phone mal-etiquette, public slovenliness and other indelicacies not worth mentioning.
The slattern's ridiculous pretension to gentility and refinement, while maintaining her slovenliness, incites us to reflect upon our own pretensions--pretense being the permanent condition of mankind.
Nothing irritated him as much as slovenliness or ambiguity in thought or expression.
I am scandalized at the intellectual slovenliness (and, therefore, moral irresponsibility) of Israeli and American Jewish polemics.
30)--another instance of Auden's slovenliness paling before Rowse's Greer Garson-like nobility, sex posing the ultimate challenge "of taste and tenue, of the way to behave.
Rather than being carefully arranged and protected from dirt under glass shades, the objects in the room constitute an "untidy litter" which, far from suggesting slovenliness, is "pretty" and implies pleasant occupations, so unlike the formal, sterile and bored existence of the ladies in the Stamers' Llyn Castle.
But equally does Soldati's story appear to be representative of certain Italians: it immortalizes their slovenliness, their pathetic and irritating mediocrity.
In the piece Orwell decries what he observes to be signs that the English language is in a state of "collapse" and "decay"; more importantly, he notes that "the slovenliness of our language" is both a symptom of, and a contributor to, a weakened political situation.
British literature of the nineteenth century developed a language for invoking Irish stereotypes, negative representations of drunkenness and slovenliness that augmented nationalist resentments against Irish Catholics.
eating bread-and-butter on the bare, dirty boards, talking with the same kind of ugly haste and slovenliness with which they ate their meal.

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