relativity

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Time dilation is referenced in the theory of special relativity.
The spacetime of special relativity is a flat, 4-dimensional structure.
Doppler shows the origins of special relativity and the de Broglie wavelength, the basis of the Schroedinger Equation.
To explain it he invented a theory of special relativity, which Prof Wright scientist is now challenging.
It is established that the plane symmetric static space-time of category C(I) is conformal to the flat, the space-time of category C(III) is the flat space-time of special relativity.
Special relativity churns out all kinds of brain-scrambling scenarios, like clocks that slow down and rulers that shrink as speed increases.
The rotational time dilation and angle contraction derived from this transformation are locally consistent with the time dilation and length contraction of special relativity of a co-moving system with a linear velocity v = r[omega].
After Einstein's 1905 paper on Special Relativity we do not ask
I will spare you the detail but for those of you who want to know more read Time Dilation: A Challenge to Einstein's Special Relativity by John Doan - a fun guy to meet at a party I can tell you).
Following the theory of special relativity, the answer is that the news could not, under any circumstances whatever, have reached more than one-fiftieth of the way across one galaxy - not one-thousandth of the way to our nearest neighboring galaxy in the 100-million-galaxy-strong universe.
This monograph is first of all the proposal of the unifying approach to particle physics, cosmology, and quantum gravity based on the most essential pieces of modern theoretical physics - Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Field Theory, Special Relativity, General Relativity, and Thermodynamics - and creates fruitful methodological background to solve the intriguing problems of high energy physics, cosmology, and gravitational physics.

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