spellbind

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There's a lot to admire in here, from Cruz's ravaging performance and the spellbindingly colorful sets to AlmodEvar's quintessential chic melancholy.
Actress Bonnie Wright, 18, who shares her first kiss with star Daniel Radcliffe in latest movie Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, looks spellbindingly sexy posing in designer togs for Grazia magazine, out today.
Beale stood out as a spellbindingly disturbing lago in Mendes's 1998 Othello, which also marked his U.
In the diary he recounts a meeting with Diana, who he described as "absolutely, spellbindingly, drop-dead gorgeous, in a way that the millions of photos didn't quite get".
It occurs to me that this is what I have been pursuing these past months, this is what I found so spellbindingly enigmatic about the image of those plastic ducks at sea--incongruity.
We hear enthralling stories of its wonders, its exoticness in a conversation William and Marianne have aboard the ship Green Dolphin when Captain O'Hara talks spellbindingly of mako sharks, forests with giant ferns, and of birds bigger than ostriches.
SAN ANTONIO -- It was a spellbindingly intense and brutal performance, and the concert hadn't even begun.
However stark or spellbindingly awful, the gory, visceral focus on a coldhearted sniper's ravages will not endear Billy to the reader, so that sympathy for him (and to a lesser extent for an acclaim-haunted M) is wanting.
Chamberlain is spellbindingly wicked in the fact-based story that was apparently adapted jointly from the book "The Richest Girl in the World" by Stephanie Mansfield and a series of pieces in Vanity Fair by Bob Colacello.
This spellbindingly sculpted metaphorical phrase, however, establishes an analogy to the previous stanza's allusion to a jungle lurking under the young woman's belly.
The movie begins, spellbindingly, with a scene, not in the play, of teen-age girls whirling around a fire they've built in a forest at midnight, chanting the names of boys they hope to seduce.
Told twenty years after the events recounted, and formally inventive through use of diary excerpts, shopping lists, letters and monologues from memory, MotherTongue develops a spellbindingly descriptive language, while the quiet story and its subtle message that no one is illegal, that principles are the stuff of life and that love and wonder can conquer all, is sublime.