fever

(redirected from spotted fever)
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Related to spotted fever: Mediterranean Spotted Fever

fever

(Excitement), noun agitation, ardor, arousing, delirium, desire, disquiet, eagerness, enthusiasm, exhilaration, fervency, fever pitch, feverish excitement, feverishness, fire, fomentation, frenzy, galvanization, heat, intensity, panic, passion, provocation, stimulation, stirring up, tizzy, turmoil, upset, working up, zeal, zealousness, zest
Associated concepts: proceedings reaching a fever pitch

fever

(Illness), noun affliction, ailment, eleeated temperature, feverishness, has a disorder, has a malady, has an affliction, has an ailment, ill health, illness, in poor health, infirmity, not healthy, sickness, temperature
Associated concepts: fee services, health care
See also: furor
References in periodicals archive ?
Most people don't realize Rocky Mountain spotted fever is east of the Mississippi," he says.
Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Mexican children: clinical and mortality factors [Spanish].
Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) has been consistently described as a potentially fatal disease.
Diversity of Life-Threatening Complications due to Mediterranean Spotted Fever in Returning Travelers.
Rocky Mountain spotted fever manifests with early, nonspecific flu-like symptoms.
14%) each was positive for OX2 and OX19 suggestive of spotted fever group and typhus group, respectively.
This study indicates that exposure to spotted fever group rickettsiae was highly prevalent among dogs compared with humans in the two villages examined, probably reflecting a greater exposure rate of canines to the tick vector.
In one study of 92 patients admitted with an ultimate diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, the rash on admission was maculopapular rather than petechial in about one-third of cases (J.
felis was considered a Spotted Fever Group Rickettsia.
The blight of the Bitterroot, the mysterious Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and the significant role of Wilson and Chowning--a commentary.
Traditionally, pathogenic rickettsiae were classified into two groups: the typhus group (TG), composed of Rickettsia prowazekii and Rickettsia typhi, vectored by lice (Pediculus humanus) and fleas, respectively; and the spotted fever group (SFG), composed of more than 20 species mostly vectored by ticks (3).