spouse

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Related to spousal: Spousal support, Spousal abuse

spouse

a party to a marriage, i.e. a husband or a wife.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
The defense argued that the plaintiff "failed to demonstrate a change of circumstances other than the dissipation of assets received in the consent judgment of divorce, and this did not suffice under the express language of the judgment." It also argued that the spousal support award was "unsupported by the evidence and inequitable."
The Medical Director of Pinnacle Medical Service, Dr Maymunah Kadiri, described spousal abuse as a behavioral circle in troubled homes where aggression is the norm.
In the divorce decree, the District Court found that Wife lacked sufficient property to meet her needs and considered the statutory factors relevant to an award of spousal maintenance.
Before the introduction of the Inland Spousal OWP pilot program, spouses and common-law partners with pending SCLPC applications had to wait for "first stage approval" before becoming eligible to apply for an open work permit.
It also awarded wife spousal support of $1,200 a month for five years.
"We find that the government's interest in having the ability to compel the testimony of a defendant's co-conspiring spouse [is] outweighed by the significant policy concerns underlying the spousal testimonial privilege," Torruella wrote.
Recipients of spousal maintenance must claim the amount received as income on their tax return.
In fact, spousal collaboration and acceptance surrounding diabetes specific health behavior decisions are linked to improved diabetes outcomes (Nicklett, Heisler, Spencer, & Rosland, 2013).
The British woman, identified only as QT in court, sued the director of immigration in 2014 after she was denied a spousal visa that would have granted her resident status and allowed her to work without the need for a separate visa.
Studies on spousal violence suggest that African women suffer the same fate, if not more, as women in other continents (Watts & Zimmerman, 2002; Howard, 2012).
The hearing arose because Mrs Bridgen applied to the court to extend her entitlement to spousal maintenance which the court rejected, accepting Mr Bridgen's position that she neither needed nor was entitled to further personal financial support.