stale

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stale

of a claim, having lost its effectiveness or force, as by failure to act or by the lapse of time. Some stale claims maybe lost forever by operation of PRESCRIPTION or LIMITATION. See CHEQUE, LACHES.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
The purposes of compulsory counterclaims and statute of limitations are simultaneously attainable because the "necessarily close relationship between the timely claim and untimely counterclaim should insure that the latter is not 'stale' in the sense of evidence and witnesses no longer being available[.]" (241) Additionally, "[b]ecause [the initial complaint and counterclaim] arise from the same incident, the compulsory counterclaim is no staler than the initial action." (242) Since Murray filed his complaint a mere one day before the statute of limitations concluded, any possibility for Mansheim to file a "timely" counterclaim, as defined by the South Dakota Supreme Court, was eliminated.
When Staler first started dealing with Ukraine--in addition to commodity trading, Cargill set up a sunflower oil processing plant there--he often was directed to the head of the central bank.
Promising young cast flounders amid comic material that's staler than week-old bread.
The more you seal them up to keep warm and save energy, the staler they become and the more lethargic you feel.
(7.) Peter Staler, The War Against the Press: Politics.
Once a string of strong stores focused on quality, the company ratcheted its image downward, offering cheaper cuts of meat, lower-priced items, and staler perishables.
The youngish Montreal-based filmmakers who have risen to prominence over the past few years don't call themselves "new wave," "indie-spirited," "dogme-influenced" or any other tag that once promised fresh excitement and is now staler than an ashtray full of butts.
Since then it has grown staler. From Bob Herbert's splenetic attack in The New York Times to the pompous defense mounted by the CEO of the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, Michael Greene, the level of discourse on Eminem has been so low as to leave many muttering a plague on both their houses.
As the week progressed, the contents grew staler and staler.
Today the paper seems staler - politically bland, culturally warmed-over, and full of catchy headlines, often about Martin Amis, that are followed by nonstories.
Certainly, these staler fantasies are resisted, as when Picasso, in Art and Lies, criticizes her mother's excessive sentimentality about her childhood, identifying her as "the stoked-up conspiracy to lie.