PACE

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See: patrol, perambulate, rate, step

PACE

abbreviation for POLICE AND CRIMINAL EVIDENCE Act.

PACE. A measure of length containing two feet and a half; the geometrical pace is five feet long. The common pace is the length of a step; the geometrical is the length of two steps, or the whole space passed over by the same foot from one step to another.

References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, Martine McCutcheon couldn't stand the pace when she appeared in My Fair Lady.
For fine dining, being seen in the places to be seen, sipping cool cocktails, partying the night away and endless shopping, Shanghai is surely your place - if you can stand the pace.
But if Lubo feels he can't stand the pace he'll use a get-out clause which allows him to retire from football on the spot, giving up the chance of Champions League action, the chance to help the Hoops retain the SPL title and around pounds 700,000 from wages and bonuses.
There's a new motto on the Tour: If you can't stand the pace, get out of contention.
I was a little sceptical about his ability to stand the pace and pressure.
ADRIAN Chiles is going into overdrive with his jogging regime - so he can stand the pace of hosting the World Cup in South Africa.
United officials felt that Ferguson had overstepped the mark with his criticism that Wiley could not stand the pace of the game with Sunderland.
Its not that Ive got too old for modern dance music and consider it a load of incomprehensible noise, oh no, and certainly not that I can no longer stand the pace.
With both players relying mainly on their backhands, it became a case of who stand the pace under pressure.
It's a holiday for the locals, but if you're a canny tourist, you can do Hamilton Thursday, Hawick Friday, Musselburgh Saturday and Perth Sunday, if you think you can stand the pace.
SCOTLAND'S Alastair Forsyth couldn't stand the pace yesterday as the Holden New Zealand Open produced a fantastic run of low scoring.
Mr McGowan,of Peckham, south London, says that if his nose can stand the pace,he hopes to finish his journey on September 12.