Balance

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BALANCE, com. law. The amount which remains due by one of two persons, who have been dealing together, to the other, after the settlement of their accounts.
     2. In the case of mutual debts, the balance only can be recovered by the assignee of an insolvent, or the executor of a deceased person. But this mutuality must have existed at the time of the assignment by the insolvent, or at the death of the testator.
     3. The term general balance is sometimes used to signify the difference which is due to a party claiming a lien on goods in his hands, for work or labor done, or money expended in relation to those and other goods of the debtor. 3 B. & P. 485; 3 Esp. R. 268.

References in periodicals archive ?
As a result, the German merchants in London's Steelyard were granted concessions on valuable tin mines in Cornwall and such favourable trading terms in England's flourishing wool trade that by the 16th century to the considerable irritation of English merchants they were handling over 90 per cent of wool exports.
Florence was the great wool centre of the period and there they used only the steelyard, a horizontal beam device and the sack was 500 of their sottile (fine goods) pounds.
To the west of the school, on the site of Cannon Street Station, was the Hanseatic wharf called the Steelyard, packed with Lutherans from the North Sea and the Baltic.
Wandering rivers of black or deep purple articulated the richly varied tonalities of the rusted steel, in which one could mark out the rude numbers that must have served some identifying function in the steelyard. One scarcely saw it as rust, and in a curious way the surfaces seemed as oddly elegant as those of travertine marble; one might even suppose that Mies, a model of whose Farnsworth House may be admired on the subjacent level of the museum, could have been educated to appreciate Cor-Ten in its intended state of metamorphosis.
OKLAHOMA CITY The Steelyard will soon have its first retail tenant, though the yoga studio has temporarily set up shop at the apartment complex.
After the festival, candidates may be offered work at the company's other events up and down the country, including Steelyard Liverpool, Steelyard London and a number of other exciting events.
TONIGHT .BLUES AT THE BAY: Steelyard Blues, Cleveland Bay, Eaglescliffe MARC OLIVER: Storytellers, Stockton 9pm, free THE FUNK COLLECTIVE: Storytellers, Stockton, 9pm, free SATURDAY .TERRY MARTIN: Ranch House Club, Thoralby Farm, Skutterskelfe, Hutton Rudby STOCKTON CALLING: Various venues, Stockton town centre GOODGREEF: Tall Trees Reunion 2015 Kirkleatham Showfield SUNDAY .EASTER MARQUEE DANCE WEEKENDER: Kirkleatham Showfield FAT MEDICINE: Top House, Marske THE STONES: Ku Bar, Stockton 9pm PS5 TUESDAY .THE AMAZONS, VIOLET DEEP: Mixtape, The Keys, Middlesbrough GUISBOROUGH Rhythm .AND BLUES CLUB GUISBOROUGH Rhythm and Blues Club will hold its festival in May with a line up that looks set to be packed.
"It took 32 of them to make a ton." Walter's nephew still has the old steelyard scales they used to determine a bale's weight.
Such is the case with Barbara Hambly's "Annie Steelyard And The Garden Of Emptiness: An Honorary Man", the first of a series of adventures set in the Middle East of first decade of the 20th century and featuring a strong-minded, independent, intelligence young woman who seeks to become a renowned archaeologist and who has been 'drafted' by her British government to serve as a secret agent in the complex political world of the Ottoman Turks, the Egyptians, and the forces that will erupt in just a few more years as the first global war.
Vicky, who would now be 32, was last seen sitting on a bench in the area of the town known as The Steelyard eating a bag of chips.
40 Which actress connects the films Joy House, Cat Ballou and Steelyard Blues?
Holbein painted murals for the German Steelyard Guildhall in London, and the famous double-portrait of the French ambassador Jean de Dinteville and Georges de Selve, a bishop (which is unfortunately too fragile to travel the two miles from the National Gallery to Tare Britain).