cell

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Related to stem cell: Stem cell therapy

cell

(Enemy combatants), noun enemy group, exxremist group, rebel organization, saboteurs, subversives, unnerground extremists
Associated concepts: enemy combatants, justice courts, miliiary tribunals, Patriotic Act, prison cells, sleeper cell, terrorist cell

cell

(jail), noun cage, cella, chamber, compartment, confined room, confinement, cubicle, cubiculum, enclosed cage, incarceration, jailhouse, penitentiary, pound, prison, prison house, small cavity, small room, solitary abode
See also: chamber, jail, penitentiary, prison

CELL. A small room in a prison. See Dungeon.

References in periodicals archive ?
They again demonstrate the ability of ReNeuron's platform c-mycERTAM technology to generate stable stem cell lines of relevant types with potential to treat a variety of disorders both within and outside the central nervous system.
The researchers also found that 1,303 of these genes were active in the stem cell and that the protein products of some of these genes, in turn, activated more genes.
Moreover, destroying an embryo for stem cells may not seem as grotesquely immoral as carving up an adult for parts, but the principle of expediency at work in both situations is still the same.
Two families of proteins related to self renewal, the polycomb gene Bmi-1 and the Wnt signaling pathway proteins, have been related to the maintenance of the tumor stem cell phenotype.
The recent isolation of adult stem cells from the mouse utricle that have the capacity to differentiate into cells from all three germ layers--and more importantly, into inner ear hair cells--offers a viable option for the treatment of hearth gloss.
Stem cell research is a controversial topic because of the religious and moral implications of the issue.
West does come across as someone with a fair degree of scientific credibility (unlike some of the groups and individuals Hall describes) but there is little doubt that his aggrandized proselytizing on the future benefits of cloning and stem cell research creates the kind of publicity that can invite a backlash from theological and conservative comers.
According to the National Institutes of Health, stem cells from embryos, so-called "pluripotent" cells, are more flexible than adult stem cells and can thus be manipulated into more types of body tissues, including bone, skin, and muscle.
The 60 or so existing stem cell lines, whose research value is still unknown, are located in 10 labs in five countries.
We must distinguish between morally licit cloning and stem cell research, and immoral cloning.