Sterling


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STERLING. Current money of Great Britain, but anciently a small coin, worth about one penny; and so called, as some suppose, because it was stamped with the figure of a small star, or, as others suppose, because it was first stamped in England in the reign of King John, by merchants from Germany called Esterlings. Pounds sterling, originally signified so many pounds in weight of these coins. Thus we find in Matthew Paris, A.D. 1242, the expression "Accepit a rege pro stipendio tredecim libras esterlingorum." The secondary or derived sense is a certain value in current money, whether in coins or other currency. Lowndes, 14. Watts' Gloss. Ad verbum.

References in periodicals archive ?
22, from Miles-Sterling Funeral Home, Sterling, with a Mass of Christian burial at 10 a.m.
Known for its ability to add value to acquired assets, Sterling will work with BH to invest $2.5 million for capital upgrades.
In the late '90s, Sterling launched another movement: the Viridian Greens.
"For several years we have been searching for a solution that's easier to use and more secure than FTP for our eMastering service," said Murat Aktar, president of Sterling Sound.
In Sterling Option I, noncontracted providers give the care.
Home, for Sterling Brown is Howard, as he has said: ".
A private funeral service will be held in the Miles-Sterling Funeral Home, 100 Worcester Road, Sterling. Burial will be in Hillside Cemetery, Sterling.
This office is the current location of Sterling Resource Funding Corp., a leading provider of credit and accounts receivable management to the staffing industry.
Sterling and Daisy lived in a cozy apartment in the Spence House near the edge of the campus.
The staff at the Sterling Healthcare Center provided Ena wonderful care and support for many years.
"It's a libation," said the Nigerian poet, "a libation for Sterling Brown."