stimulus

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stimulus

noun activator, animator, arouser, calcar, catalyst, catalytic agent, cause, drive, encouragement, fillip, goad, impetus, impulse, incentive, incitement, inducement, influence, mooivating force, motive, needle, prod, provocation, push, reason, shock, spur, stimulant, stimulation, stimulative, stimulator, sting, urge, whet
See also: cause, impetus, incentive, inducement, instigation, motive, origination, provocation, reason
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of discrimination training on stimulus generalization.
However, their occurrence provides a straightforward illustration of the behavioral process of stimulus generalization, albeit over-generalization with respect to the conventional meanings.
Future research could examine whether parent-reported improvements on weekly ECBI scores are associated with stimulus generalization of parents' skills during PCIT.
Many psychologists and philosophers have had the intuition that response generalization and stimulus generalization are extremely important phenomena when it comes to justifying the postulation of intervening variables.
Stimulus generalization and equivalence classes: A model for natural categories.
The fear of stimulus generalization may be unjustified by the fact that the problem behavior was already occurring at steady rates in the classroom, suggesting that it was under control of relevant stimuli in the classroom prior to functional analysis.
Stimulus generalization decrement or stimulus change, due to the compounding of the excitatory flavor and the test flavor (extinguished of preexposed), might largely be responsible for the summation effect after both extinction and preexposure.
At the more general level, although we employed stimuli very different from what has been used in most studies of stimulus generalization and employed procedures that differ from those of animal operant-laboratory experiments, we replicated the general finding of gradient shift, thereby attesting to the robustness and generality of this effect (Ghirlanda and Enquist 2003; Honig and Urcuioli 1981).
Shaping procedures and stimulus generalization procedures (also termed programming common stimuli and stimulus fading in previous research) have been identified as the two most common effective behavioral interventions for promoting speech (Stone, Kratochwill, Sladezcek, & Serlin, 2002).