stinging


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According to the company, stinging insects become a nuisance in late summer and autumn when they nest around homes, buildings and areas where people live, work and play.
But stinging nettles can be challenging to encounter.
To investigate, the collaborators isolated the molecular component of olive oil responsible for the stinging sensation, which they named oleocanthal.
Rather, Hassan was holed up in a glass enclosure crawling with more than 6,000 stinging scorpions.
Wasps, bumblebees and hornets can sting repeatedly and do not leave their sting behind, but honey bees die after stinging once.
Between 1980 and 1996, stinging and biting insects caused 13 deaths in Oregon, accounting for 17 percent of animal-caused deaths, according to the state Center for Health Statistics.
They will first send off warning signs to the intruder that they are ready to attack by bouncing off the animal or person without stinging, Fisher said.
Although less than 1% of the population is allergic to fire ant stings, most people will experience unpleasant stinging sensations and welts.
A bee's stinger works fine for stinging other bees and insects, but human skin is too tough to allow the stinger to be pulled out.
With the start of summer comes the appearance of common stinging insects, such as bees, wasps, hornets and yellowjackets, and the various related health risks that range from irritating but relatively harmless stings to the threat of serious allergic reaction.
May 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Outdoor sports activities can turn deadly for those who are allergic to stinging insects, if stung.