stand

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Stand

The location in a courtroom where the parties and witnesses offer their testimony. To appear in court; to submit to the jurisdiction of the court.

To stand trial, for example, means to try, or be tried on, a particular issue in a particular court.

stand

(Position), noun attitude, belief, bent, bias, inclination, leaning, opinion, outlook, point of view, position, slant, standpoint, vantage point, view, viewpoint

stand

(Witness' place in court), noun booth, box, place, platform, position, post, stall, station, witness box, witness stand
See also: bear, belief, desist, endure, halt, last, lie, opine, opinion, outlook, remain, resist, resistance, rest, stay, suffer, thesis, tolerate, withstand

TO STAND. To abide by a thing; to submit to a decision; to comply with an agreement; to have validity, as the judgment must stand.

References in classic literature ?
Far otherwise th' inviolable Saints In Cubic Phalanx firm advanc't entire, Invulnerable, impenitrably arm'd: Such high advantages thir innocence Gave them above thir foes, not to have sinnd, Not to have disobei'd; in fight they stood Unwearied, unobnoxious to be pain'd By wound, though from thir place by violence mov'd.
All the time that he gazed upward to the zenith, he was, nevertheless, perfectly aware that little Pearl was hinting her finger towards old Roger Chillingworth, who stood at no great distance from the scaffold.
Here stood old flower-pots with faces and asses' ears, and the flowers grew just as they liked.
A score of brave shots were gathered there, and among them some of the keenest hands at the longbow in Lincoln and Nottinghamshire; and among them Little John stood taller than all the rest.
So we stood on one side, and a second party of the Isanusi women began their rites.
Anna Mikhaylovna with her eyes indicated a chair that stood beside the bed.
Three or four soldiers stood on the lawn of the inn, staring and jesting at the fugitives, without offering to help.
In the shadows by Williams' barn George and Louise stood, not daring to talk.
He was otherwise quite self-possessed, bowed to the Judge, and stood quiet.
While my would-be murderers were holding this whispered colloquy, I had stood half-petrified by the open window; unwilling to slide down the sheets into the arms of an unseen enemy, though I had no idea which of them it could be; more hopeful of slipping past my butchers in the darkness, and so to Rattray and poor Eva; but not the less eagerly looking for some hiding-place in the room.
I stood still and let him come up; he held the oats to me, and I began to eat without fear; his voice took all my fear away.
He had taken up a book from the stall, and there he stood, reading away, as hard as if he were in his elbow-chair, in his own study.