strict meaning

strict meaning

noun accurate meaning, correct meaning, defined meaning, definition, distinct meaning, exact meaning, explanation, explicit meaning, express meaning, faithful meaning, inflexible meaning, literal meannng, methodical meaning, meticulous meaning, narrow meaning, not subject to interpretation, ordinary meaning, plain meaning, precise meaning, prescribed meaning, rigid meaning, rigorous meaning, sharply defined meaning, specific meaning, unbending meaning, uncommromising meaning, unequivocal meaning
Associated concepts: construction, literal contract, literal proof, plain meaning rule, rules of statutory, soft plain meaning rule, textualism
References in periodicals archive ?
However, security in Tel Aviv, Israel, is quite strict meaning he will have to think of a way round the issue to have his tipple this week.
This is sure to bring a silent smile to every parent who deals with a child who follows very closely to the strict meaning of words used while being instructed them.
What lies behind reform or restructure in education must be sought in the strict meaning of the term itself.
In the strict meaning of the term, 'autonomy' is thus an ideological category that joins an element of truth (the separateness of art from the praxis of life) and an element of untruth (the hypostatization of this fact, which is a result of historical development as the 'essence' of art."
The flip side of this coin is that beyond the strict meaning delivered in this judgement, depending on what the Ontario government does, it may well become a major link in the legal quest of the "gay" community for legal--and social--acceptance as normal and equal to marriage.
Its literal meaning-"the primary or strict meaning of a word"-has been lost in its new popularity as an intensive adjective.
"It is not a true Citizen's Jury because that phrase has a strict meaning. It is the health authority seeking the views of a group of Birmingham residents who have a keen interest in what happens."
A relational modeler can be dimension-driven, variational, or parametric in the strict meaning of the word.
At this time in Paris, Vostell began developing an artistic process he called "decoll/age," and although the French decollagistes (Raymond Hams, Jacques de la Villegle, et al.) had been working in this vein from as early as 1949, Vostell--who innovatively applied the concept to live performance--would later claim to have coined the term, on September 6, 1954, after reading an account of a plane crash in Le Figaro: "Shortly after take off (decollage) a Superconstellation fell from the sky, plunging into the river Shannon." "I ran to the dictionary and found that the strict meanings of the term were 'to detach' and 'to die,"' Vostell recalled.