Stultify

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TO STULTIFY. To make or declare insane. It is a general rule in the English law, that a man shall not be permitted to stultify himself; that is, he shall not be allowed to plead his insanity to avoid a contract. 2 Bl. Com. 291; Fonb. Eq. b. 1, c. 2, 1; Pow. on Contr. 19.
     2. In the United States, this rule seems to have been exploded, and the party may himself avoid his acts except those of record, and contracts for necessaries and services rendered, by allegation and proof of insanity. 5 Whart. R. 371, 379; 2 Kent, Com. 451; 3 Day, R. 90; 3 Conn. R. 203: 5 Pick. R. 431; 5 John R. 503.; 1 Bland. R. 376. Vide Fonb. Eq b. 1, c. 2, Sec. 1, note 1; 2 Str. R. 1104; 3 Camp. R. 125; 7 Dowl. & Ryl. 614; 3 C. & P. 30; 1 Hagg. C. R. 414.

References in periodicals archive ?
(72) See Birks, Unjust Enrichment, above n 2, 217-18, where Birks assumes, unconvincingly, that 'stultification' could not be established in the 'Swaps Cases'.
That identity of cause and effect is the principle of stultification. On the contrary, the principle of emancipation is the dissociation of cause and effect.
The result can be legal stultification. This is particularly salient in the context of patent law, where changes in technology and markets can render legal rules outdated at a faster rate than in other legal contexts.
'stultification' relied on by the late Professor Peter Birks,
It is hard to imagine that a Western-allied constitutional monarchy would have inflicted as much suffering, murder and economic stultification as Tito's regime did.
Failure to do so leads to cultural stultification. But what is worrying are demands to erase and silence the past where it conflicts with current preoccupations.
For these adolescents, typical feelings of constraint and stultification are amplified by their hometown's edgeless, inoffensive exterior.
To avoid this state of the stultification of mind, the grand royal princess of Senegal, Samba's aunt, was obliged to send her nephew to France to study science and technology.
Nahma Sandrow, whose Vagabond Stars: A World History of Yiddish Theater (1977) introduced a generation of Yiddish scholars to the delights of Yiddish theater, provides an overview of the genre, while Hasia Diner, one of the deans of American Jewish history and a careful observer of the Jewish-American city, explains why New York City was such fertile soil for the European emigrants fleeing Tsarist repression, economic malaise, or, in the case of the actor, maybe even perceived cultural stultification.
Modern science, one of the greatest creations of the human spirit and an unquestioned source of endless, even miraculous, blessings, is widely perceived as the most important cause of stultification of the human spirit.