subject to


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Related to subject to: Subject to Change

subject to

adj. referring to the acquisition of title to real property upon which there is an existing mortgage or deed of trust when the new owner agrees to take title with the responsibility to continue to make the payments on the promissory note secured by the mortgage or deed of trust. Thus, the new owner (grantee) buys the property "subject to" secured debt. However, should the new owner fail to pay, the original debtor will be liable for the payment, but the holder of the mortgage or beneficiary of the deed of trust may foreclose and the buyer could thus lose title. This differs from the new title holder "assuming" the mortgage or deed of trust by a written transfer of the obligation. Such a transfer must be approved by the lender, since the new owner's credit may or may not be as strong as the original owner/borrower. (See: mortgage, deed of trust, assumption)

References in periodicals archive ?
1.833(j) provide that, if the sale of property at a profit within six months after its purchase could subject a person to suit under Section 16(b) of the '34 Act, the person's rights in the property are treated as subject to a substantial risk of forfeiture and as not transferable until after the earlier of the expiration of the six-month period or the first day on which a sale of such property at a profit will not subject the person to suit under Section 16(b).
A VEBA allows more tax-deductible contributions than a 401(k) plan because it is not subject to strict pension plan guidelines.
Measuring the psychological effects of isolation and quarantine will require studies comparing psychological symptoms of healthcare workers subjected to quarantine with those who continued working, as well as studies comparing randomly selected persons subject to isolation with the general population living in the city during the outbreak.
Active listening skills are specific communication techniques designed to demonstrate understanding, encourage the subject to talk and verbally vent emotions, and build rapport between the individual and the negotiator.
Schneider, who has no interest in the "decisive moment," liked the idea of recording a subject over time, and, in effect, making time his subject: "I wanted to get away from the whole nature of modern technology, which allows a photographer to select a moment and allows the subject to project a particular image of themselves--their camera face." But he knew he'd need more than a few minutes to subvert his sitters' self-consciousness and to make the emotional connection he craved.
In conclusion, they suggested "good immunologic results even without corresponding virologic success can be associated with favorable clinical outcome." The authors also noted that holding back antiretroviral therapy is an alternative at early stages of HIV infection, but that patients should be subject to "regular clinical, immunologic, and virologic surveillance." They recommend further studies to compare the benefits and risks of these different therapeutic strategies in moderately immunosuppressed patients.
But companies based outside the United States can be subject to the U.S.
The Board also shall take into account whether the foreign bank is subject to comprehensive supervision or regulation on a consolidated basis by its home country supervisor (12 U.S.C.
First, it applies to major stationary sources subject to Title V.
Tax practitioners know that if the transfer of property subject to a liability results in gain recognition, there is also a step-up in the basis of the transferred property.
She is no longer an object to be beaten or used or played with, but a subject to be recognized and respected.
As such, the efficiency and effectiveness of services provided by state VR programs will continue to be subject to close public scrutiny.