subject

(redirected from subjects)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

subject

(Conditional), adjective contingent, dependent on circumstances, depending upon, inciient to, incidental, provisional, relying upon, subiectus, subordinate, uncertain
Associated concepts: subject to approval, subject to defeaaance, subject to review

subject

(Exposed), adjective accountable, at the mercy of, chargeable, liable, open, prone, unexempt from, vulnerable

subject

(Object), noun case, experimentee, liegeman, recipient, testee, victim
Associated concepts: subject of an investigation

subject

(Topic), noun affair, argumentum, content, course, gist, issue, material, matter, motif, pith, point, point at issue, quaestio, study, text, theme, thesis
Associated concepts: interest in subject matter, subject of agreement, subject of bailment, subject of commerce, subbect of statute, subject of tax

subject

verb bring under domination, bring under rule, cause to undergo, conquer, control, crush, defeat, dominate, enslave, enthrall, expose, get the better of, govern, hold down, hold in bondage, hold in subbection, humble, keep down, make liable, make submissive, make subordinate, make subservient, master, obnoxium reddere, oppress, overcome, overmaster, overthrow, quell, repress, rule, subdue, subicere, subjugate, subordinate, suppress, tame, triumph over, vanquish, worst
See also: article, captive, compel, constrain, content, contents, dependent, dominate, inferior, issue, meaning, object, passive, question, require, servile, subdue, subjugate, subordinate, subservient, thesis

SUBJECT, contracts. The thing which is the object of an agreement. This term is used in the laws of Scotland.

SUBJECT, persons, government. An individual member of a nation, who is subject to the laws; this term is used in contradistinction to citizen, which is applied to the same individual when considering his political rights.
     2. In monarchical governments, by subject is meant one who owes permanent allegiance to the monarch. Vide Body politic; Greenl. Ev. Sec. 286; Phil. & Am. on Ev. 732, n. 1.

References in classic literature ?
The most simple and familiar portion of time, applicable to the subject was that of a year; and hence the doctrine has been inculcated by a laudable zeal, to erect some barrier against the gradual innovations of an unlimited government, that the advance towards tyranny was to be calculated by the distance of departure from the fixed point of annual elections.
Some portion of this knowledge may, no doubt, be acquired in a man's closet; but some of it also can only be derived from the public sources of information; and all of it will be acquired to best effect by a practical attention to the subject during the period of actual service in the legislature.
For if, as you say, justice is the obedience which the subject renders to their commands, in that case, O wisest of men, is there any escape from the conclusion that the weaker are commanded to do, not what is for the interest, but what is for the injury of the stronger?
And the deeper she penetrated, not with her mind only but with her whole soul, her whole being, into the subject that absorbed her, the larger did that subject grow and the weaker and more inadequate did her powers appear, so that she concentrated them wholly on that one thing and yet was unable to accomplish all that she considered necessary.
If the author, who finds himself limited to a particular class of subjects, endeavours to sustain his reputation by striving to add a novelty of attraction to themes of the same character which have been formerly successful under his management, there are manifest reasons why, after a certain point, he is likely to fail.
Such annotations as may be useful to assist the reader in comprehending the characters of the Jew, the Templar, the Captain of the mercenaries, or Free Companions, as they were called, and others proper to the period, are added, but with a sparing hand, since sufficient information on these subjects is to be found in general history.
Other things, again, are both predicable of a subject and present in a subject.
There is, lastly, a class of things which are neither present in a subject nor predicable of a subject, such as the individual man or the individual horse.
Fortunately for him, at this period so difficult for him from the failure of his book, the various public questions of the dissenting sects, of the American alliance, of the Samara famine, of exhibitions, and of spiritualism, were definitely replaced in public interest by the Slavonic question, which had hitherto rather languidly interested society, and Sergey Ivanovitch, who had been one of the first to raise this subject, threw himself into it heart and soul.
The subject was a German who kept a liquor-shop aud was an inveterate drunkard.
No, you needn't leave us; it's a subject in which you are interested.
By some capricious revulsion of feeling which it seemed impossible to account for, my whole mind was now absorbed on the one subject which had been hitherto so strangely absent from it--the subject of Mrs.