submitted


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submitted

n. the conclusion of all evidence and argument in a hearing or trial, leaving the decision in the hands of the judge. Typically the judge will ask the attorneys after final arguments: "Is it submitted?" If so, no further argument is permitted.

References in classic literature ?
She saw with maternal complacency all the impertinent encroachments and mischievous tricks to which her cousins submitted.
I was glad to accept her hospitality; and I submitted to be relieved of my travelling garb just as passively as I used to let her undress me when a child.
Native servants always salaamed and submitted to you, whatever you did.
Magdalen stopped his mouth by a summary process, to which even Frank submitted gratefully.
Because he had voluntarily relinquished a title that was distasteful to him, and a station that was distasteful to him, and had left his country--he submitted before the word emigrant in the present acceptation by the Tribunal was in use--to live by his own industry in England, rather than on the industry of the overladen people of France.
That, and a sense that we were both a little afraid of Peggotty, and submitted ourselves in most things to her direction, were among the first opinions - if they may be so called - that I ever derived from what I saw.
Pocket did not object to this arrangement, but urged that before any step could possibly be taken in it, it must be submitted to my guardian.
The weaver, too feeble to have any distinct purpose beyond that of getting help to recover his money, submitted unresistingly.
He submitted to the operation without remonstrance, except that, darting a reproachful look at his master, he said, ``This comes of loving your flesh and blood better than mine own.
I then insisted on the matter being submitted to arbitration, and demanded fifteen hundred pounds as the full exchange value of the picture.
At last, I fixed upon a resolution, for which it is probable I may incur some censure, and not unjustly; for I confess I owe the preserving of mine eyes, and consequently my liberty, to my own great rashness and want of experience; because, if I had then known the nature of princes and ministers, which I have since observed in many other courts, and their methods of treating criminals less obnoxious than myself, I should, with great alacrity and readiness, have submitted to so easy a punishment.
William the Conqueror, whose cause was favoured by the pope, was soon submitted to by the English, who wanted leaders, and had been of late much accustomed to usurpation and conquest.