subservience


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This final EU Constitution, consistent with the previous Draft Constitution, confirms our assessment, it calls for subservience to the UN Charter in various ways, using such phrases as "strict observance for," "in accordance with," "respect for," "in conformity with," "without prejudice to," and "establishing all appropriate forms of cooperation with.
Their language was Hebrew, and their culture moved from patriarchy through tribe and kingdom to end in subservience to foreign rule and diaspora.
Instead of focusing on Beauvoir's pioneering contribution to feminine identity and equality, Ozouf goes back to misogynist cliches, exposing the asymmetry of her lifelong liaison with Sartre, her servile subservience to Sartre's work, projects, timetable, and mistresses.
In Japan, where female office workers are often expected to make tea and tidy up after their male colleagues, becoming a flight attendant offers women a greater payoff in prestige for the kind of subservience that would probably be expected of them anyway.
In rejecting the notion of the fiesta mitologica as an artistic bauble or flattering act of political subservience, Greer problematizes the registers of political meaning discoverable in these texts more insightfully than any other scholar who has written on the subject.
The subservience of Philippine authorities to US interests on our own territory must end, the statement added.
Meek subservience for an enslaved Britain under bureaucratic Brussels appears to be the collective aim.
Then, as now, the Worthy Oriental Gentlemen knew how to keep women in a proper state of subservience.
What would make us much mightier as a nation would be if our government sought a leading role in Europe and ended our subservience to the US.
Collective tribal actions related to religious reform and struggles against economic subservience are considered next, along with Dalit ("untouchable") mobilizations in their Ambedkarite and Gandhian manifestations.
We would never have been at such risk - as other European states are not - were it not for Tony Blair's own impetuous and jingoistic subservience to George W.
Wilson also looks at the relationships between social history and cognate disciplines, lamenting a lack of engagement with literature and literary materials and castigating an enduring subservience towards the social sciences.